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The Wikipedia article on Tetragrammaton gives a long list of examples from Greek and Latin in early manuscripts and patristic writing. The overwhelming majority use "Lord", but a few use proper transliterations, such as Ἰαῶ in Greek and "Jaho" in Latin.


8

There is the word γλῶσσα and a great number of other words derived from it. Here is a list of words containing -ωσσ-, giving more examples.


8

In the oldest stratum of loan words Semitic t and k are generally represented by τ and κ, while the emphatic stops ṭ and q are represented by θ and χ. Witness the names of the letters tau and theta. In later loan words Semitic t and k are generally represented by aspirated θ and χ, while ṭ and q are represented by unaspirated τ and κ. This probably has to do ...


7

There are quite a few, actually. Just to add some more examples: ἥττων "less" πράττω "do" (impv. πρᾶττε shows the length) πλήττω "strike" μᾶλλον "more" ἤλλαγμαι, pf. m./p. of ἀλλάττω "exchange" ἡλλόμην, impf. of ἅλλομαι "jump"


7

That's not a C, but a G: relicto igitur initii Chr[is]t[i] verbum This Latin is not the Vulgate at all, but a separate Latin translation made prior to it part of what's collectively known as the Old Latin texts. (This is not to be confused with Old Latin, the form of Latin before the Classical period.) The form of 'Christi' here is a Greek 'nomen sacrum'...


6

Being trained in physics and mathematics, I enjoy seeing questions on these topics here! Indeed, Latin has various spelling conventions regarding U and V. I am not sure how well search engines cope with this; if you transcribe a title to lower case, it might not be as easy to find. I did not check this particular case, but of course you are safe when you ...


5

As a supplement to the above answer, here is a full transcription and translation of the dictionary entry: Haec honorificabilitas -tatis, et haec honorificabilitudinitas -tatis: Et haec est longissima dictio, ut patet scilicet in hoc versu: fulget honorificabilitudinitatibus iste Et corripit penultimam "honorifico" -tas. Translation: ...


4

I think there is only one hexameter verse: Fulget hon/orifi/cabili/tudini/tatibus / iste. This contains a word even longer than the headword. It would not scan right without the addition of the dactylic -tudini-. I would translate it as "he shines in his honor(-related thing)". The following line does not seem to scan as a hexameter or pentameter, ...


4

fdb has already given an excellent translation, but I'll take a different angle. Imagine you went back in time to the forum in Ancient Rome (somewhere in the Classical period) and shouted your name at random people until one of them wrote it down. What would the result look like? There are a few different sounds here without exact equivalents in Latin, but ...


4

It is already in “Latin characters”, but perhaps you are asking for a Latin translation of your name? ʻUmar is a primary personal name in Arabic, without a transparent etymology, so perhaps it is best to transfer it as “Umarus”. Arabic Ḥāfiẓ could be “Protector”. Arabic Muḥammad is “Laudatus”. Persian Jahāngīr means “conquering the world”; I cannot think of ...


3

Thanks for your interesting question. I think the key is the sequence ..ptonesh.. which suggests Northamptonshire to me. et Joh.is Norgate de Naptoneshir If that doesn't seem likely, Du CANGE, Charles du Fresne, 1610-1806 Glossarium mediae et infimae latinitatis (in 10 vols) is on line through ARCHIVE. I checked vol six p.247 for occupations ...


3

The vast majority of Semitic words transcribed in Latin come directly from Punic; Krahmalkov provides a summary of the conventions in his Phoenician-Punic Grammar. g, d, l, m, n, r were transcribed as g, d, l, m, n, r 'Aleph and `ayin were completely ignored in transcription, and went silent at some point in Punic history b was transcribed as b; later, as f ...


2

The oldest Greek transcription I've found is from Diodorus of Sicily (The Library of History I.94.2): παρὰ δὲ τοῖς Ἰουδαίοις Μωυσῆν τὸν Ἰαὼ ἐπικαλούμενον θεόν Among the Jews, Moses [attributed his laws to] the god called "Iaō". The oldest Latin one I've found is Pseudo-Jerome (Breviary on the Psalms 8: in this manuscript, it's on 12v-13r): Prius ...


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