23 votes

Has anybody encountered this abbreviation/spelling before?

It should say Inas or Ina. Ina, whose name is referred to as Ine on Wikipedia (unclear if this is because of a modernisation of his weakly declined Old English name or because ancient sources are also ...
Agnes's user avatar
  • 466
11 votes
Accepted

Transcribing and translating the passage read by Thomas More in Wolf Hall

This is from the New Testament of the Bible, 2 Peter 2. Translation from the 1611 KJV: But there were false prophets also among the people, euen as there shall bee false teachers among you, who ...
njuffa's user avatar
  • 478
8 votes

What are the conventions for transcribing Semitic languages into Greek?

In the oldest stratum of loan words Semitic t and k are generally represented by τ and κ, while the emphatic stops ṭ and q are represented by θ and χ. Witness the names of the letters tau and theta. ...
fdb's user avatar
  • 17.8k
8 votes

Does any Greek word have a geminate consonant after a long vowel?

There are quite a few, actually. Just to add some more examples: ἥττων "less" πράττω "do" (impv. πρᾶττε shows the length) πλήττω "strike" μᾶλλον "more" ἤλλαγμαι, pf. m./p. of ἀλλάττω "exchange" ...
TKR's user avatar
  • 31.3k
8 votes
Accepted

Does any Greek word have a geminate consonant after a long vowel?

There is the word γλῶσσα and a great number of other words derived from it. Here is a list of words containing -ωσσ-, giving more examples.
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
8 votes

Is the Abrahamic god ever named in Classical-era Latin or Greek?

The Wikipedia article on Tetragrammaton gives a long list of examples from Greek and Latin in early manuscripts and patristic writing. The overwhelming majority use "Lord", but a few use proper ...
Figulus's user avatar
  • 4,579
7 votes
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Transcription of 3 latin lines in Dutch medieval manuscript

As stated in the comment by @Draconis, the "h"- and "C"-like glyphs appear to be the planetary symbols ♄ and ☾. Since plumbo is spelled out in the text, it appears that these are ...
gmvh's user avatar
  • 3,004
7 votes
Accepted

How should I best present the title of this mathematical work written in Latin?

Being trained in physics and mathematics, I enjoy seeing questions on these topics here! Indeed, Latin has various spelling conventions regarding U and V. I am not sure how well search engines cope ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

Trouble transcribing a line of Latin from Codex Claromontanus

That's not a C, but a G: relicto igitur initii Chr[is]t[i] verbum This Latin is not the Vulgate at all, but a separate Latin translation made prior to it part of what's collectively known as the ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 54.6k
5 votes
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More on the 'honorificabilitudinitatibus' citation

As a supplement to the above answer, here is a full transcription and translation of the dictionary entry: Haec honorificabilitas -tatis, et haec honorificabilitudinitas -tatis: Et haec est ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 40.8k
4 votes

What are the Latin lyrics to Ringo Starr's "Pax Um Biscum (Peace Be With You)"

The lyrics seem to be a corruption of: Pax Vobiscum This means, "Peace be with you." The subsequent lyrics of the song confirm this. Though this particular phrase doesn't occur in the ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 40.8k
4 votes

Transcribing Latin with or without ligatures -- is there an agreed convention

In this context, I would transcribe "Maria + contraction mark" as "Mariae" or "Mariae̲" and include a note explaining that your transcription expands contractions and ...
Asteroides's user avatar
4 votes

Request to convert name into Latin

fdb has already given an excellent translation, but I'll take a different angle. Imagine you went back in time to the forum in Ancient Rome (somewhere in the Classical period) and shouted your name at ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67k
4 votes

Request to convert name into Latin

It is already in “Latin characters”, but perhaps you are asking for a Latin translation of your name? ʻUmar is a primary personal name in Arabic, without a transparent etymology, so perhaps it is best ...
fdb's user avatar
  • 17.8k
4 votes

More on the 'honorificabilitudinitatibus' citation

I think there is only one hexameter verse: Fulget hon/orifi/cabili/tudini/tatibus / iste. This contains a word even longer than the headword. It would not scan right without the addition of the ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

What are the conventions for transcribing Semitic languages into Latin?

The vast majority of Semitic words transcribed in Latin come directly from Punic; Krahmalkov provides a summary of the conventions in his Phoenician-Punic Grammar. g, d, l, m, n, r were transcribed ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67k
3 votes
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Help with paleography: What does this manuscript say?

I believe I have found the correct transcription. In "Family, feud, and fertility in late Medieval Artois and Flanders" by Theresa Lorraine Tyers (2018), we have the following transcription: ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 40.8k
3 votes

Help with paleography in a 16th century grant

Thanks for your interesting question. I think the key is the sequence ..ptonesh.. which suggests Northamptonshire to me. et Joh.is Norgate de Naptoneshir If that doesn't seem likely, Du CANGE, ...
Hugh's user avatar
  • 8,683
3 votes
Accepted

Is the Abrahamic god ever named in Classical-era Latin or Greek?

The oldest Greek transcription I've found is from Diodorus of Sicily (The Library of History I.94.2): παρὰ δὲ τοῖς Ἰουδαίοις Μωυσῆν τὸν Ἰαὼ ἐπικαλούμενον θεόν Among the Jews, Moses [attributed his ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67k
2 votes

Translating words in a Manorial Court Roll of 1699

Partial answer (to question 1:) blushing because of my schoolgirl error. iujuslibet turns up in a lot of Latin documents online. However, looking for it in a dictionary requires it to be typed in as ...
ColeValleyGirl's user avatar
1 vote

Translating words in a Manorial Court Roll of 1699

And an answer to question 2: cepit extra manus D[omi]ni extradico[?]ne Senesca[lli?] pred[icti?] The problem phrase is 'ex tradicione' (2 words not one) and in this context means 'by grant', so in ...
ColeValleyGirl's user avatar
1 vote

Encoding abbreviated 'quod' in Unicode

Recently the needed glyph has became available in the JuniusX font as a stylistic variant of U+0111 LATIN SMALL LETTER D WITH STROKE (cv06). As the text in question does not contain U+0111 in its ...
Janusz S. Bień's user avatar
1 vote

Encoding abbreviated 'quod' in Unicode

I think you're asking for a Unicode glyph to represent the flourished d in the abbreviation. The Unicode standard doesn't have one. However, you might be able to approximate with Latin Small Letter D ...
Andrew Leach's user avatar

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