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How do you write dates in Latin?

I will split this answer in two halves, for two different kinds of date expression. On November 4 The traditional Roman calendar, whose system is still in use in some festive occasions, is based on ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
19 votes
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Are the names of these months realistic?

In addition to the familiar September–December, there were two more numerically named months before they were renamed in early imperial era: Quintilis and Sextilis. These should definitely go to your ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
15 votes
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Ante urbem conditam

Your first suggestion seems spot on: "ante urbem conditam" is correct and has several classical examples. Cicero provides the most convincing example of this usage: itaque et illos septem, ...
brianpck's user avatar
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15 votes
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Why was ante tribus translated as "fifteen years ago"?

Lustrum has several meanings, but that which applies here is the period of five years which elapsed from census to census. The phrase is actually lustris ante tribus, or 'three lustra ago'. A good ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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14 votes
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What is "old" in the age of a wine?

I have found three ways of referring to the age of wine, the first of which is the most common and simplest: An adjective such as anniculus, bimus etc. quadrimum Sabina, o Thaliarche, merum diota ...
Penelope's user avatar
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14 votes
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How do we know that Kalendae is the first day of a month?

In classical times the seven-day week was unknown; obviously, there could be no named days of the week to use as reference points. Months at least were of specified lengths, but the actual date was ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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10 votes
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How to say "every fourth year" in Latin?

I've been thinking of this one and suddenly remebered the use of singulis + period of time in pl. abl. (singulis annis, singulis horis). Singulis quadrienniis is even attested a couple of times: 1, 2, ...
Rafael's user avatar
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10 votes

How do you write dates in Latin?

For the sake of completeness, I have seen lots of Ecclesiastical Latin dates written in the form: [die] roman numeral day (from I to XXXI)/[mensis] month in genitive/[anni] roman numeral year. Just ...
Rafael's user avatar
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10 votes

Are the names of these months realistic?

To supplement Joonas's wonderful answer, the words for "eleven" and "twelve" in Latin are undecim and duodecim, with an i. So I would suggest those months be changed to Undecimber and Duodecimber.
Draconis's user avatar
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8 votes
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How would you say, "How long have you been a X?"

'For how long' can be rendered quamdiu (or quam diu). In this case, because an ongoing state is described, I'd use a present tense verb. For the answer, the accusative of duration does indeed exist in ...
cnread's user avatar
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8 votes

What is "old" in the age of a wine?

There is a direct quote for this situation in the Satyricon, where Petronius just uses annus in the genitive plural: Statim allatae sunt amphorae vitreae diligenter gypsatae, quarum in cervicibus ...
blagae's user avatar
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8 votes
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Times in latin: in 4 hours, at 4, until 4, from 4

While Manuel's answer is essentially correct, I believe some elaboration may be helpful. It is true that in Latin, you generally use ordinal numbers for hours (as for years, by the way!), so you say ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
7 votes
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How to distinguish Julian and Gregorian calendars in Latin?

Google conjures up a good number of old books with "stylus (or stilus) vetus" and "stylus (stilus) novus".
fdb's user avatar
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7 votes
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Times at the end of daylight saving

The question posted is analogous to the other one: how do you distinguish the sixth hour of the morning with the sixth hour of the afternoon? In English, two expressions in Latin are used: ante ...
Wtrmute's user avatar
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6 votes

How to say "every fourth year" in Latin?

It just occurred to me that I could express "every fourth year" as semel quoque quadriennio, literally "once in every period of four years". I think that avoids the ambiguity, but it is not very ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes

How to express a time exactly on the hour?

I like exacte, though I worry that its similarity to "exactly" might be leading me to think it's closer to what you need than it actually is. It occurs to me that adamussim ("to the level") might also ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
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6 votes
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How to phrase "it took two hours"?

FWIW, the verb consumo, can be used with amounts of time as meaning to spend: horasque multas saepe suavissimo sermone consumeres (Cic. Fam. 11.27.5) Hence a possibility is to say you spent two ...
Rafael's user avatar
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6 votes
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Is 'datus' used for a date in Latin?

For reference, this is what the OED has to say: Etymology: < Anglo-Norman dat, Anglo-Norman and Middle French date (Middle French datte ; French date ) regnal year (1230 or earlier), date (...
fdb's user avatar
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6 votes
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On meaning and syntactic structure of "usque eo quoad his sex annis"

Quoad here is a correlative of usque eo. i.e., thus/so far (usque eo) until/that (quoad). syntactically it is like the more common (usque) adeo/eo... ut/quo/dum/donec. like this Seneca's example Haec ...
d_e's user avatar
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5 votes

How would this date be translated into Latin?

In classical mode this is rather complicated, but would be abbreviated to a.d. VI Id. Iun. A.D. MMX, literally short for 'the sixth day before the Ides of June in the Year of the Lord 2010'. In more ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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5 votes
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How is time period expressed in Latin?

Both ex and ab can be used for specific dates. Here are two examples from Cicero's Epistulae ad Atticum; the first uses ex, and the second uses a(b). For the upper limit of the range, ad or usque ad ...
cnread's user avatar
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5 votes
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Which case to use with posthinc?

As a first note, I have been unable to find a classical work where posthinc is treated as one word. The two Vergil citations in the L&S entry you mentioned actually have post hinc: post hinc ...
brianpck's user avatar
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5 votes

How would you say, "How long have you been a X?"

I suggest that you take a look at this old question about similar structures. The conclusion was that present tense is the way to go. Latin has an adverb diu, meaning roughly "for a long time". I ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes

What did the Romans call the New Year?

The best indication is Ovid's Fasti, I, 63 et seqq.: Ecce tibi faustum, Germanice, nuntiat annum / Inque meo primus carmine Ianus adest. / Iane biceps, anni tacite labentis origo, / solus de superis ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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5 votes

How do we know that Kalendae is the first day of a month?

First point, the meaning of the Latin dates was never forgotten but traded continously (e.g. by the Roman Catholic church) into our times. A second point is that we are able to verify some dates ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
5 votes

Are nocte and noctu interchangeable?

Adverbs are not normally modified by adjectives. And 'noctu,' occurs mostly in Livy, usually on its own, but sometimes modified by the adverb: secretly 'clam.' And occasionally with numquam, fere, ...
Hugh's user avatar
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4 votes

How to express a time exactly on the hour?

At least for your first request: I heard (literally heard [from living-Latin person]), the expression in puncto that was used to mean "exactly". It was used to denote an exact amount of ...
d_e's user avatar
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4 votes

How to express a time exactly on the hour?

Take two! I think to specify "at four o'clock on the dot", you might have to say something like "at the beginning of the fourth hour". Using classic texts as a guide, some options are: initio + ...
Penelope's user avatar
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4 votes

How to make a Roman sundial and tell the time in Latin

One of the best primary sources for sundials is from Vitruvius, "On Architecture", book 9. He describes mathematically how to construct a sundial based on the works of the earlier Greek philosophers. ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes
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Translation of "since 1950" (for example)

First off, please congratulate your parents on such a marked achievement! Now, I'm not sure if there is something specific to marriage, but I know such a general construction exists. The Romans used a ...
Sam K's user avatar
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