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This is a great question: it's certainly difficult to find Latin words with uncertain meaning that are not hapax legomena. My entry is cortumio, -nis. L&S says that it is "an old word of the augurial language, perhaps equivalent to contumio, from contueor" Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français is more sanguine about the meaning, tracing its ...


11

I would suggest the PHI corpus search. To try out your example, I searched for numquam, facile, and mori close to each other, and the whole phrase by Seneca turns up — among a couple of false positives. The syntax is quite flexible, allowing you to force word boundaries (so that searching for mori doesn't return memoria), decide whether words are ...


9

Your word, honorificabilitudinitatibus, seems to be commonly regarded as the longest, and it has the distinction of being used by Shakespeare. However, there's also this one with 28 letters: floccinaucinihilipilificatio, which is the action or habit of estimating something as worthless. Although the latter is longer by one letter, it was coined by ...


9

The PHI Classical Latin Texts Database http://latin.packhum.org The Packard Humanities Institute provides free access to Latin Litterature texts from the beginning to ~200 AD. There are currently two functions for searching through the database. It can be involved by using some keywords : You can refine a search with logical operators. & and | or ...


9

I wouldn't even try to guess which words are most commonly 'not understood'. The natural world is a rich category here, with many examples of species that cannot be exactly identified: though reasonable guesses are made, they are often with reservations. These include both plants and animals, some of which occur in several places My off-the-cuff offering ...


6

This is a meta-answer on How to find Latin corpora? Go to the Virtual Language Observatory (run by the European Union financed CLARIN project), search all resources and restrict the search to Latin Language and Resource type Corpus. On the day of writing this answer, this search yields 26 hits. The corpora are of very different nature and often contain ...


6

I know of three openly accessible Latin corpus with grammatical tags labelled by humans: PROIEL https://github.com/proiel/proiel-treebank/ Perseus https://github.com/PerseusDL/treebank_data Index Thomisticus http://itreebank.marginalia.it/view/download.php Perseus is the smallest dataset (~4900 sentences) that covers classical authors. PROIEL is larger (...


6

You can find some at Attalus, along with a bunch from Roman Britain. The latter is region-specific, but breaks it all down for you. There isn't one way to do so, and there's no special language that can be applied to every curse, though certain themes and vocabulary are frequent and sometimes "magical" gibberish is used in incantations. Lead tablets are ...


6

A type of curse seems to have been the phrase "te perdant" after a deity. For example, "Iuppiter te perdat!" and "Iuppiter te dique perdant!", which seem to mean something like "That Jupiter destroys you!" (from here via google) More generally: (from here via google) Another form of curse seems to have been "i in malam crucem!" (or "abi in malam crucem!",...


5

Plautus, Bacchides, lines 816-7: quem di diligunt / adulescens moritur He whom the gods love / dies young Menander, Dis Exapatōn (fourth century BCE), fragment quoted in Stobaeus (KT 111): ὃν οἱ θεοὶ φιλοῦσιν, ἀποθνῄσκει νέος. He whom the gods love, dies young. Neither Dis Exapatōn nor Bacchides survives completely, but the fragments we have ...


5

The best-known type of curse is called a dēfixio, literally "binding", calqued from Greek κατάδεσμος. The word itself is more modern; while Roman dēfixiōnes do tend to use the verb dēfīgō, the noun wasn't nearly as common as in Greek. Dēfixio tended to involve writing a prayer on a metal tablet, then "binding" it somehow. Some might be simply folded in half,...


5

The Latine version of Wikisource Wikisource can be a good idea, as I think its code is pretty good standardized — as an illustration, books can be exported in many formats with this (experimental) feature: http://tools.wmflabs.org/wsexport/tool/book.php. Furthermore, the corpus isn’t limited to classical Latin (there you can find works of Newton for ...


4

The Latin Library is one possibility. It is very light, consisting of simple HTML pages with no unnecessary features. There are no additional features, just the Latin texts. Some might argue that also necessary features are missing, but that is always a matter of taste. The corpus has a large collection of texts which can be found following the links. There ...


4

Of course! For instance, LatinISE historical corpus.


4

As Tom Cotton answered, there are many possible answers in the natural world. According to Wikipedia, both Virgil and Cicero mention aurichalc, which is famous enough to have its own Wikipedia page. Ipse dehinc auro squalentem alboque orichalco circumdat loricam umeris, simul aptat habendo ensemque clipeumque et rubrae cornua cristae, ensem, quem ...


3

As announced in his comment, AlexB got ahold of Puglia 2007, sent it to the mods, and our tricipitous mod forwarded it to me. I read it, and I can now answer that part of this question. So, with a lot of pretty solid arguments, the article proposes the following collage of P.Oxy. 1787 fragments (where 87(13) and 87(14) have swapped numbers): From this, we ...


3

I presume that you've been clicking the orange XML button directly below the chunk of text. If you look beneath that, in the gray box that gives licensing info, the second paragraph has an XML version link. This will open/download a copy of the complete text (in Betacode though, which I know you don't really want), not just the chunk that you're viewing.


3

You can find it here. Tricky, tricky, you have to add the zeroes in front of it to pull it up.


3

Lobel-Page (p. 37) give .[.......] γὰρ ἐφίλει δυ[, saying, "Sub coloph. 2076 schol. vestigia...quod quorsum spectet obscurum est." I'm not trained in papyrology (I much prefer inscriptions—far easier to read!), so it's difficult for me to judge, at least without seeing the papyrus in person.


2

I was taught Latin prose composition in a way that is now almost forgotten. There were many tricks of the trade to be acquired, including such basic rules as correctly sequencing tenses; most of these could be found in the primers and study guides — as they can be still — and one of these was how to change emphasis by altering word order, which apparently ...


2

Maybe this is what you are searching for? Collatinus: http://outils.biblissima.fr/en/collatinus/


2

Hathi Trust is a large database of digitilised texts from universities all over the world (kind of an academic version of archive.org). Everything (as far as I know) is searchable. For "Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum", there are many results. The first page shows volume 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7.


2

First of all, with all due respect, this word is not Classical Latin; it’s a Medieval Latin neologism (a nonce word) that was occasionally used solely because of its length. Secondly, honorificabilitudinitatibus is technically a word form, not a word (i.e. it’s not a lexeme). Afaik, it is first encountered in a treatise written by Peter of Pisa, an eighth ...


2

Perhaps because there is no evidence that this is Sappho.


2

I took the liberty of asking directly to the authors, receiving this reply: PS: the authors' email addresses are publicly available on their websites, so I think it should not be a problem to show it above. If you disagree, let me know.


1

At least one authority thinks your fragment is in fact Pindar: this turns up in the Snell/Maehler Teubner edition of Pindar, as fragment 52wi of the Paians. See http://www.poesialatina.it/_ns/Greek/testi/Pindarus/Fragmenta01.html Luckily, we can see the Teubner on Google Books: https://books.google.com.au/books?id=rWAgAAAAQBAJ&pg=PA68&dq=δέρκεν&...


1

If you're serious about Sappho, you need to work with the following editions: Campbell 1982 (reprinted with corrections in 1990); Lobel and Page 1963 and, of course, Voigt 1971. For instance, all the editions listed above have, in line 10, "καυχάϲ[α]ιτ̣ο" (iota with a dot - Alex B.). cf. Obbink 2016a - this is one of the leading papyrologists of our ...


1

One contribution this papyrus certainly gave is at l. 9. The middle line in the image reads ΜΥΠ̣ ϹΔ€, giving us a σδ cluster, whereas the manuscript tradition, according to Bergk's note, is unanimous on having a ζ there. The other possible contribution, which I am fairly skeptical about, is "the psi issue". The corrupted l. 19 can be seen in the papyrus as:...


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