12

The name Wi-Fi never was an abbreviation of "wireless fidelity". Therefore I see two approaches to naming it in Latin: Use Wi-Fi as a name. Express the idea "wireless network access" somehow. In the first approach the name would be indeclinable, so there is no case inflection. Cases can be expressed by an auxiliary word (possimne uti Wi-Fi tuo?) or the ...


7

To me, wifi feels like a word that the Romans would have just borrowed rather than used their own phrase for. If you swap out the W for a V and treat it like a third declension noun, you get vifis as the genitive noun. I'm not sure how awkward that would sound to those more experienced than me, though. I suppose it's better than vaefae, though. :)


5

What's the closest word Classical Latin (Greek?) would have used for mobile machines, even if they don't have a human shape? (NB: this answer is adapted slightly from another answer I gave here) I think perhaps automaton or automatum. I’m not aware of any Roman writings on robots as such, whereas the Greeks wrote surprisingly frequently about robot-like ...


5

The word was invented by Karel Capek's brother in 1920 and used in his novel (in Czech), of which the title is translated into English as 'Rossum's Universal Robots'. It suggests (forced) labour robota and related words in Slavic languages (e.g. Russian robotnik, 'worker'). The Romans adopted plenty of foreign words quite without shame, for simple ...


5

What you did added a Greek keyboard (a keyboard used in Greece) for writing Latin characters. To write in Greek characters, you should click "Add a preferred language" instead. After the Greek language is installed, you should add the "Greek Polytonic" keyboard (assuming you're learning Ancient Greek). The keyboard allows for acute, ...


4

If you don't want to have to change keyboards and just want to be able to type Greek characters occasionally, you might find it more useful to install WinCompose, a free app that turns the AltGr key into a Compose key. That means I can type AltGr * S and I get Σ, for example. It adds a whole load of other codes (like AltGr a - → ā or AltGr a e → æ and a ...


4

The Roman aqueduct is considered one of the greatest inventions of the ancient world. Commenting on this technology, Cicero had the following to say: Adde ductus aquarum, derivationes fluminum, agrorum irrigationes, moles oppositas fluctibus, portus manu factos, quae unde sine hominum opere habere possemus? Ex quibus multisque aliis perspicuum est, ...


2

"Appendix V" of the book Conversational latin for oral proficiency contains three pages of computer terms (vid. infra a selection of them: e.g., computatrulum portabile for "laptop". NB: I've just googled for a while and it seems that the more frequent term is computatrum portabile, i.e., without any diminutive suffix). Computatrum ...


1

Before using, please read the copyright information in the readme.md file. https://github.com/PerseusDL/canonical-greekLit Please note also that this is a work in progress: https://github.com/PerseusDL/canonical-greekLit/wiki The above is in unicode, not beta code. But also note that there are a few betacode to unicode translators available.


1

As luchonacho suggests, ars ingeniaria is good for "engineering". To express the direction, I would add the adjective prorsus, meaning "straightforward, straight, direct" and giving rise to the concept of prose. Thus, I'd suggest ars ingeniaria prorsa. Prorsus is more common as an adverb, but it is also an adjective. The kind of use of this adjective I ...


1

I agree that computatrum is good for 'computer' (and so, incidentally, did the Pope's Latin Secretary — thirty or so years ago, though he also advocated computatorium). But the main thing here is surely to convey the idea of portability, leading me to suggest computatrum portandum; in the proper context, just as 'laptop computer' is shortened to a single ...


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