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18

Basically, your second option is correct. There is the Vatican's Lexicon Recentis Latínitátis, referred to in the comment, but its approach to Latin is very idiosyncratic; debates over neologisms often get incredibly acrimonious, if you can believe it, but there are (VERY roughly) two schools: the "Ciceronian," in which making up words for concepts that didn'...


11

You've probably already checked here, but Smith's Copious and Critical English-Latin Dictionary offers fornax vaporifer as a "furnace emitting steam", citing Statius' Silvae 1.3.45: An quae graminea suscepta crepidine fumant balnea et impositum ripis algentibus ignem, quaque vaporiferis iunctus fornacibus amnis ridet anhelantes vicino flumina ...


11

The classical author Vitruvius was familiar with a basic steam turbine, which he describes in De architectura I.VI.2 thus: Fiunt enim aeoli pilae aereae cavae, - hae habent punctum angustissimum - quae aqua infunduntur conlocanturque ad ignem; et antequam calescant, non habent ullum spiritum, simul autem ut fervere coeperint, efficiunt ad ignem vehementem ...


9

A suitable word in Spanish is caldera, which sounded pretty Latin to me. So looking at L&S I finally converged to caldaria. One of its meanings is: A pot for boiling Even if you were not looking for a word for pot, I think the analogy remains valid.


9

This kind of boiler is also known as a steam generator, and direct translations from relevant words in other languages are mostly "steam generator" or "steam pot". One could take for example the Italian expression "generatore di vapore" and adapt to Latin. The result, generator/generatrum vaporis, should be easily understood and descriptive. I find the ...


8

I can think of many ways of going about this, but for such an unapologetically modern idea I think the best approach may be to observe how other related modern languages have solved this problem and extrapolate how a similar transformation might work. Spanish: googlear Portuguese: googlar Italian: googlare French, though, seems to be a hold-out: I have ...


8

I suggest numerus pravus for 'incorrect' and numerus nimius for 'too large'.


7

A caminus (from Greek κάμινος) is a furnace, so another possibility is a caminus vaporalis.


7

Fieri solet ut charta mundatoria sit in capulo binis modibus ponenda. In vulgus gratus est modus quo charta procidit summo de volumine. In altero modo retro decidit charta iuxta parietem. I think that you need to keep it simple, without inventing such a word as orientatio. Would cursus be neater, do you think?


7

David Morgan's lexicon (warning: big file) suggests citatus, -a, -um for "express" in this context. His suggestions for "express train" are: tramen* citatum, hamaxostichus* citatus (The * indicates that it is a modern word found after AD 1400. I won't comment on which is better, since that's not really the OP's question.) Here are some sample uses: ...


6

Regarding Linux, there seem to have never existed such OS (but non existence hard to prove). As this is an open-source OS, it is based on collaboration, and as such, translation are made by enthusiasts of a given Language. There have been efforts in the past, like KDE and Gnome, but both seem dead. The only project I could find to be still "alive", albeit ...


6

After searching for classical words that were used to similar effect, I have two suggestions for the word account: breviarium and summarium. My preference is for breviarium, which means "a summary, abridgment, abstract, epitome" and which, when combined with rationum, means "statistical view". Here are some example usages: Commentarios, quos desideras, ...


6

As I've mentioned elsewhere, I'm not a huge fan of Vicipædia, and this is part of the reason why. Technologia informátiónis is fine as far as a literal translation of the words, but it feels very un-Latinate. I'd go for something like ars computátrális or the simple word computátrália.


6

Machina is indeed a good translation for "machine". In plural it is machinae, so this translation is correct. You have to be careful with the English word "people". If you refer to a people (where "people" is singular), the Latin word is populus. (The word populo is the singular dative or ablative of this word. Such inflected forms are not a good choice ...


5

Numen isn't the best without either ignoring the "all around us" aspect or resorting to some discredited twentieth century arguments about the word. Still, as a means of personal power in a Jedi, I can see it being used. However, what is most commonly used is indeed vis, which was standard at least back in 2000. For the full phrase, Vis vobiscum (or in the ...


5

This was cited in the answer to a recent question as the de facto standard for Latin technology vocabulary by C. M. Weimer. Acording to it, the verbs corruo and collabor are enough for a soft crash. L&S cites corruo as to fall, sink to the ground and with an active meaning of someone to ruin sth. Meanwhile, collabor is more explicit in meaning to fall ...


5

I would suggest: In case the numeral is incorrect (e.g., IVI) numerus falsus ... or is too large numerus magnus nimis Perhaps you can also add error: or erratum: at the beginning of the message (albeit the latter is commonly found in printed books for correcting printer errors, so not sure it fits in the context).


5

If Latin prose had an "extremely loose word order", which is (generally) not the case, the appropriate linguistic term involved would be "non-configurationality". However, rather than being vaguely classified as a free word order language or as a non-configurational language, Latin has been referred to in the recent literature on Latin syntax as a "discourse ...


4

Tabula is good, but ratio is better usage. Accounts, of course, come from banking language, and ratio is one of the most natural ways to express such a term in Latin: Relation, reference, respect to a thing: “(agricolae) habent rationem cum terrā, quae nunquam recusat imperium,” have an account, have to do, have dealings with the earth, Cic. Sen. 15, ...


4

What about tabula sodalis or tabula sodalicia (with an understood rationum or rerum gestarum)? I offer as support Cicero, Pro Quinto Roscio. Yonge's translation uses "account" very literally in some places here, but in other places he uses "books" and I think an extension of the metaphor isn't inappropriate. Is scilicet vir optimus et singulari fide ...


4

I ended up having to write "information technology" in a formal context in Latin, and I chose technologia informatica. It may not be as natural in Latin as the suggestions Joel gives in his answer, but it has the crucial benefit that people with no knowledge of Latin can interpret it correctly. There is also a difference between "information technology" and "...


4

Multiling O Keyboard is a light and fully customisable keyboard, which provides a Latin dictionary. Apparently, you need to install that app, and then select the Latin plug-in.


4

LibreOffice If you want spellchecking for Latin, someone's made a pretty decent LibreOffice Latin spellcheck dictionary. And LibreOffice works on Linux, Window, and Mac, is open source, free, and awesome, so you should have it anyways. After you install LibreOffice, follow these instructions to install the Latin spellcheck dictionary: In LibreOffice, ...


4

First, let's just note that the English phrase "machine learning" does not unambiguously communicate its meaning. If you had no context for it, you wouldn't know if it meant using a machine to learn, or learning about machines, or a machine doing the learning, etc. So, you've essentially asked for a translation that's more precise than the original phrase. ...


4

How about redde for "return" and ede for "yield"? These keywords are orders ("do so and so"), and therefore I find imperatives most natural. The verb reddere means giving back, and I think that captures the idea of "return" pretty well. One might also consider the simple da, but that would bring it closer to giving than returning. Whether a value is ...


4

The word was invented by Karel Capek's brother in 1920 and used in his novel (in Czech), of which the title is translated into English as 'Rossum's Universal Robots'. It suggests (forced) labour robota and related words in Slavic languages (e.g. Russian robotnik, 'worker'). The Romans adopted plenty of foreign words quite without shame, for simple ...


4

What's the closest word Classical Latin (Greek?) would have used for mobile machines, even if they don't have a human shape? (NB: this answer is adapted slightly from another answer I gave here) I think perhaps automaton or automatum. I’m not aware of any Roman writings on robots as such, whereas the Greeks wrote surprisingly frequently about robot-like ...


3

This question raises a bunch of questions I actually find more interesting, but which are, alack, out of scope of this Stack Exchange instance: How did the learnèd coiners of χρήστης, the Modern Greek word, get the voice of the Ancient verb χράομαι wrong? (Active: "to furnish", in particular "to furnish an oracle"; hence, as @brianpck notes, "oracle-giver" ...


3

Some quick fiddling on my own Android phone revealed that I have an app installed called GBoard which does have a Latin option. So yes, it is possible, but I haven't used it at all so I have no information how well it will handle the variation in endings of nouns and, even worse, verbs. I'm not sure if this is installed by default on my or all Android ...


3

I'd think of reverti "to bring back". BTW, undelete is very idiomatic English and cannot be translated in a 1-to-1-fashion to many other languages. In German user interfaces the word rückgängig ist used (from rückgängig machen, for English back-translations see e.g., this dictionary.


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