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1

Depends on how you define a dative of possession, but Woodcock §62 gives a few examples: Sese Caesari ad pedes proiecerunt, "They threw themselves at Caesar's feet" (BG 1.31.2) This is the clearest one to me to function equivalently to the dative of possession. miseris valemina nautis, "sails for poor sailors" (Verg. Georg. 3.313) ...


2

The phrase is often DIS MANIBUS SACRUM. I.e. "Sacred/Dedicated to the spirits of the departed". So the "sacrum" is understood. Treat it as a separate sentence, indicating what the nature of the inscription is. Abbreviated D.M. or D.M.S. There are 19,000 plus examples in Clauss-Slaby. E.g. CIL 7298. D(is) M(anibus) s(acrum) / Vera ...


1

I've just taken a look at Pinkster's (2015: 292) Oxford Latin Syntax and I've discovered that examples like the following ones are attested: Promunt condita aut propterea quod sunt tuenda, aut quod utenda, aut quod vendunda. (Var. R. 1.62.1) Sive enim ad sapientiam perveniri potest, non paranda nobis solum ea sed fruenda etiam est. (Cic. Fin. 1.1.3). At ...


-6

I am going to diverge from brianpck's answer. In my opinion the OP is correct, or at least partially correct. The translation in the vulgate is WRONG. Basically Jerome got it wrong when he translated it 1600 years ago. Even though βασιλείας is indeed genitive, it is a genitive of place, not a genitive of possession. The Greek genitive is much different than ...


10

The Latin is a pretty literal translation of the Greek: καὶ κηρύσσων τὸ εὐαγγέλιον τῆς βασιλείας "τῆς βασιλείας" (tēs basileias) is genitive, not dative. He is preaching the Gospel of the kingdom, not preaching the Gospel to the kingdom. This makes sense. The "kingdom" in question--as is clear from many other passages throughout the New ...


4

In this case, and in many other cases, the details of obstare are given in a subordinate clause. That subordinate clause, introduced here by quominus, has bellum as its subject. But the grammatical role of bellum could be anything, depending on how the subordinate clause is put together, and this has nothing to do with obstare. Bellum is not an object of ...


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