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10

What follows is not an answer but just some initial thoughts related to your question. My first impression/intuition is like the one you express at the end of your post. I'd be surprised to find examples that follow the specific schema you suggest (i.e., "non AA sed AA") in a classical author like Cicero. However, I must also say that I would be less ...


7

The gender of a predicate noun can differ from the gender of the subject There is no problem with a predicate noun having a different gender from the subject. Predicate adjectives are grammatically required to agree with the subject in gender and number, but predicate nouns are not required to agree in either of these categories. In some cases, a noun of a ...


4

A lot of grammars describe the characteristics of sentences involving the particles μέν and δέ. A good example of that is A Greek Grammar for Colleges by Herbert Weir Smyth. In spite of a detailed analysis of the subject, he didn't address this specific question. The same goes for a lot of other grammars, which leads me to believe that it wasn't that common ...


3

The verb veniunt doesn't work as directly with the gerundive (future passive participle) as you think. Omnia consideranda is "everything that must be considered", so it should be more along the lines of: [These] come before everything that must be considered. You can argue that the meaning is practically the same, but I think there is a meaningful ...


3

Yes, the predicate of an ablative absolute can be a gerundive. But the matter is complicated by the question what a real ablative absolute is and what separates it from other constructions. You have specified your own, somewhat formal criteria. Others draw a distinction between the various functions of the ablative, the absolute being distinct from the ...


2

As Asteroides points out, a predicative noun can freely differ in gender and your suggestion is correct. I want to add that it goes in fact further: in (very) rare cases a predicative adjective can have different gender too. In the Aeneid (4.569–570) you can find the expression varium et mutabile semper femina. It is a complete sentence with an ...


2

As pointed out by Joonas, it is VERY important to give the relevant/full quotes (at least, in these cases). Otherwise, the poster can receive contradictory feedback. For example, Joonas answered as Cicero would probably did. Indeed, in Classical Latin the only interpretation/analysis of the first example is the one given by Joonas. However, it is the case ...


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