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6 votes

Does scansion ever require synizesis of two similar vowels?

The word "sŭŭs" is always counted as a sequence of two distinct vowels in latin hexameter, as you can see, for example, in Verg. georg. 4,190: In noctem, fessosque sopōr sŭŭs ōccŭpăt artus in Ov. ...
qwertxyz's user avatar
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6 votes
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Does scansion ever require synizesis of two similar vowels?

Here's an example from Lucan's Bellum civile (8.321) where īt is used and ĭĭt would break the meter: nomen abit aut unde redi maiore triumpho? (8.321) The form abiit would produce three short ...
cnread's user avatar
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3 votes

Does scansion ever require synizesis of two similar vowels?

Synizesis of ee is supposed to occur in forms of the verb deesse. Presumably the result was [eː], with the same pronunciation as ē. This seems very similar to the contraction seen in words like dēbeo ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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3 votes
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Synizesis in perfect tense 'ui'

I went through the first two books of Aeneis and found no evidence of this kind of synizesis. These two books contain 25+31 perfect forms of the kind (with the ending starting with a short 'i'). Some ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes
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Why is elision more common than synizesis?

I haven't read any linguist's comments on this matter, so my post is just a collection of guesses. Perhaps for grammatical reasons Elision frequently deletes vowels that are part of grammatical ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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1 vote

How common was synizesis in classical poetry?

This is a simple-minded study of a very specific case of synizesis to get a concrete numerical example. I am looking at the letters -eo- (next to each other in the same word) in the first two books of ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar

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