6

A corpus search shows 18 hits for scibam including four with ne- and 4 hits for scibat with none with ne-. The variants sciebam and sciebat have 79 and 145 hits (15 and 22 with ne-), respectively. Overall, it seems that the imperfect endings without the -e- are rare. For example, I found only one occurrence of audibat but 36 for audiebat. Based on this, I ...


5

Manu Leumann's Lateinische Laut- und Formenlehre (Munich 1977) groups the contraction of -āvis- to -ās- in forms like amāstī and amāssem together with the contraction of -āver- to -ār- in forms like amāram and amāro. Leumann says that "Bei Plautus sind noch die Kurzformen seltener als die Vollformen" ("in Plautus, the short forms are still rarer than the ...


4

You might be surprised to learn that forms with -āv- and -īv- (amāvī, audīvī) are extremely rare in Classical Latin, considered archaic and pretentious by major grammarians! It certainly came as a surprise to me about a month ago, after eight years studying classics… The upshot is, you should absolutely expect audīeritis instead of audīveritis. Contraction ...


4

After talking to another classicist, I can offer some thoughts, though sadly without definitive sources. It seems unlikely that the two are related, for various reasons: Contracted perfects are extremely rare with the syncopated ending: amārunt and amāvere are both possible for the third person plural perfect, but *amāre generally isn't. Historically, the ...


3

The vowel is definitely thought to have been long in forms like amāsti. In my comment, I was saying that the first vowel might be shortened in certain forms that show loss of intervocalic -v- without contraction of the originally separate syllables into one: -ie- and -ii- from -īve- and -īvi-. A vowel before another vowel in Latin was usually short, even ...


3

V can be lost when it acts as a perfect "suffix" (not found in the present stem) Cser 2016 gives the rule that -v- cannot be lost when it is "part of the lexical makeup of the verb" ("Aspects of the Phonology and Morphology of Classical Latin", p. 117), agreeing with TKR's suggestion in the comments. In other words, -v- usually ...


2

I agree with sumelic's answer in that the vowel is long before a consonant in forms like amasti and iurarunt. The unexpected shortening you are asking about occurs in my understanding exclusively when the v is lost but the second vowel is not lost. I have never seen this happen outside the fourth conjugation. To be sure that the vowel is indeed short before ...


2

I think this is not normally done, except if the perfect stem ends on -ev/iv/av-, because only then does one get the familiar contracted sequences -esti/isti/asti. The sequence -usti would look too unfamiliar as a perfect contraction, I think, not to mention -urunt. I believe irregular perfecta on -evi/ivi/avi are mostly irregular because the verb has a ...


1

The other answers explain the "what" very well; I wanted to add a bit on the "why". According to Brent Vine (in Klein's Handbook of Comparative and Historical Indo-European Linguistics): These [forms] have their sources in phonological reductions (thus audīstī and the like with regular glide loss and contraction for /u̯/ between like vowels), but then ...


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