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10 votes
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What is the superlative of ipse?

Joonas is correct: those forms don’t belong in good classical style. Peter Stotz’s Handbuch zur lateinischen Sprache des Mittelalters mentions that Donatus explicitly forbade comparatives and ...
Dario's user avatar
  • 3,246
9 votes

What is the superlative of ipse?

Classical corpus searches suggest that ipsimus is only attested in Satyricon and ipsissimus is used once by Plautus and once by Afranius. There are not enough attestations to decide which is correct, ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

Why is the superlative form of "fertilis" "fertilissimus" rather than *fertillimus?

The superlative ending -illimus is actually exceptional, although the exceptional adjectives are quite common. The adjectives with this superlative ending are facilis, difficilis, similis, dissimilis, ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
7 votes

does there exist "valde <superlative>"?

No, valde can at most take a comparative adjective, not a superlative. However, "vel" can be used in your case. "vel" + a superlative is common in Latin literature, for example in Cicero's Pro Roscio ...
TerryA's user avatar
  • 171
6 votes

Comparison of participles

We can semantically distinguish an adjective or adverb from a participle. Adjectives and adverbs have no dynamic or temporal force. They cannot take an accusative or clause as their object. They ...
Kingshorsey's user avatar
  • 6,678
6 votes

Comparison of participles

I used corpus searches to constrain the possibility of participle comparison. Here are the observations: Superlative of future participle: The only words with -turissim- are forms of maturissimus. No ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

does there exist "valde <superlative>"?

Georges’s Dictionary has references for valde optimus and valde summus from Pliny and Valerius. http://www.zeno.org/Georges-1913/A/valde
fdb's user avatar
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5 votes
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Rerum to strengthen an adjective?

I am not perfectly sure I interpret your question correctly, but I assume you mean one of two things. In both of them it is not that important that it is rerum; it could be almost any other genitive ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
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How to determine if "senissimus" is a Latin word?

Latin is a heavily inflected language, and only very specific forms are found in dictionaries. To see whether a form would be legitimate, it is best to understand how it is formed. Even if a specific ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Superlatives (Cambridge Latin Course)

It is pretty common for superlatives in Latin to be absolute in the sense that there is no comparison. The superlative just indicates great extent. Indeed, laetissimus seems to be a more idiomatic ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
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Optimus and the comparative and superlative uses of adjectives in Latin

This is a bunch of questions, so I will give only a short answer to each. If you want more details, please ask a follow-up question with a narrower focus to dig deeper. What are the superlative and ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes

Can "quam" be used as a mere intensifier to a superlative?

I think I have three examples, one modern and two medieval: they were found with o quam + the specific superlatives in the search box. De Maximiliani Romanorum. Imperatoris ... laudibus ... epistola; ...
Hugh's user avatar
  • 8,693
3 votes

Comparison of participles

Pliny, writing of the pyramids of Gizeh in Naturalis Historia XXXVI: sed multo spectatior [comparative degree of positive spectatus, specto's perfect passive participle], "but much more splendid&...
Kevin McFoy Dunn's user avatar
3 votes

Comparison of participles

It seems to be difficult to distinguish participles from nouns/adjectives. This is a problem, because it seems clear that some adjectives with the form of participles have comparative forms. The idea ...
Asteroides's user avatar
  • 29.3k
2 votes

How to determine if "senissimus" is a Latin word?

The Wiktionary entry you linked to has a reference "senissimus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)", which in turn links to ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
1 vote
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How would you say "I am too stupid for this university." in Latin?

I'm not entirely comfortable with using quam ut and no verb - maybe someone else can confirm whether this is done or not. An easy way round would be to add a verb - i.e. "I'm too stupid to go to ...
Alexandre's user avatar
  • 481

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