13 votes
Accepted

What does the suffix -mentum add to a word's meaning?

According to Miller (2006: 76, 78), the endings -men and -mentum form a deverbal (with one exception) noun with the semantics of means, instrument or result of action of the verb. Relevant quotations ...
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13 votes
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What is the difference between -us and -io?

Unfortunately, it seems that people have tried for centuries to answer this question, with limited success or at least limited consistency. For example: In his 1841 Dictionary of Latin Synonymes, ...
13 votes
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'Fomites'? From 'fomes'?

The etymological derivation of the noun fōmes, fōmitis from the base of the verb foveo is too difficult for me to answer. So in this post, I'll focus on something else in your post that I think I ...
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12 votes
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What is the origin of the -a in words like "collega, advena"?

It is generally believed is that "The Italic "1st declension" continues PIE feminine formations ("ā-stems") built with an invariable suffix *-eh2(-)" (Vine 2017: 755) cf. Beekes 2011 proposal of ...
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10 votes
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Is "-landia" good Latin?

The suffix -landia is definitely derived from Germanic land. It has no clear cognates outside the Germanic languages and there are some hypotheses that it is a loan from some pre-indogermanic European ...
10 votes
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Latin suffixes in the noun "vertebra"?

There are two distinct words here: The noun vertebra. The adjective vertebralis, "related to vertebra". The adjective is derived from the noun, and both the noun and the adjective have ...
10 votes
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Is there a suffix that means "like", or "resembling"?

Despite verisimilis (which Lewis and Short note should be separated), I would instead recommend going the Greek route using -ειδής suffix. This means "in the shape or form of" and can be ...
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9 votes
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Constructing Latin diminutives

I think abdomunculum would be the most regular diminutive of abdomen. But it seems a bit difficult to me to give a clear answer because the rules about "proper" diminutive suffixes are often based on ...
  • 22.8k
9 votes

'Fomites'? From 'fomes'?

I believe you and the OED are talking about two different things. As you can see from the very same passage, the genitive is fomitis. This is par for the course for 3rd declension nouns. You find the ...
  • 42.7k
8 votes

Did the "-ālis" and "-āris" suffixes have the same meaning in Latin?

They not only had the same meaning in Latin, they were the same suffix. In Latin, the suffix -āli- (the -s at the end is the nominative ending, so not part of the suffix) formed adjectives from nouns....
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8 votes

Is there a suffix that means "like", or "resembling"?

Appendicitis is an inflammation of the processus vermiformis, the appendix in the shape of a worm. A search for words that end in -formis in L&S yields 20 results. Some of these have numbers: ...
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7 votes
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Etymology and pronunciation of words ending in “-iasis”

Pronunciation Below you can see the vowel lengths marked by L&S and by OLD. Note that OLD doesn't cover post-Classical vocabulary. (In this table L&S = the online L&S via Perseus; OLD = ...
  • 1,011
7 votes

How did the Latin past participle suffix -atus develop into modern French -é?

There is a regular sound change by which Latin a (long or short), when stressed and in an open syllable, became [e] or [ε]. A few examples out of many: mare > mer amāre > aimer nāsum > nez The past ...
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7 votes
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What does the -met ending mean in "vosmet" or "temet"

It's for emphasis, and older than the use of ipse as an intensifier. From Allen & Greenough §143.d: Emphatic forms of tu are tute and tutemet (tutimet). The other cases of the personal pronouns,...
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7 votes
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Feminine form of -ίδης

Yes, feminine forms exist. This is covered in sections 845–848 of Smyth's Greek Grammar. Here are some examples: Βορέας > Βορεάδης, 'son of Boreas'; Βορεάς -δος, 'daughter of Boreas' Θέστιος > ...
  • 18.3k
7 votes
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Suffixes -τρον, -θρον, and -εθρον

The endings -τρον, -θρον (and actually, a bunch of others also) are thought to share a common origin, but the origin of the τ/θ difference in particular is hypothesized to involve Proto-Indo-European ...
  • 22.8k
6 votes

Where does the suffix "-etum" come from?

Allen & Greenough lists -etum/-tum under the heading 'Nouns with Adjective Suffixes' (section 254). It notes that the suffix denotes 'place of a thing, especially with names of trees and plants to ...
  • 18.3k
6 votes
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Is cultura a future participle?

Gary Miller, in Latin Suffixal Derivatives in English and Their Indo-European Ancestry says that there is no direct relation between nouns formed from verbs with -ura and the similar future active ...
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6 votes

What is the difference between -us and -io?

I assume that you are asking about nouns like motus, -ūs, not the perfect passive participle motus, -ī. The former is one of many masculine abstract deverbal nouns with the suffix –tu-, like cantus “...
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6 votes

What is the diminutive of κῆτος?

The adjective κήτειος for kēte(s)-ios, with the usual contraction of ε + ι > ει suggests that we should expect *κητείδιον as well.
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6 votes

Opposing meanings of the suffix -gena

The variants -gena and -genus This ending has two forms: -gena (inflected as a first-declension masculine/common gender noun, potentially used adjectivally) and -genus, -gena, -genum (inflected like a ...
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6 votes
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Why do numbered months in the ancient Roman calendar have different suffixes?

This is going to be an unsatisfying answer, but I'll post what I've found anyway. The usual best source for Latin etymologies is De Vaan. Unfortunately, he only covers developments from Proto-Indo-...
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6 votes
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Is the constellation named Lupus a male wolf? or could it be female?

There is in fact a word lupa which is the normal word for a female wolf. (If you use it in your story, however, you might want to be aware that for whatever reason, it's also a common word for "...
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6 votes

What is the gender and singular declension of the scientific Latin suffix -idae?

I think it is the patronymic -ides, which is in the first declension in Latin. The plural forms are regular, so bovidae 'sons of a cow' would be bovides in the singular. It would be a masculine noun. ...
5 votes

Unde "-cundus"?

The common ending -bundus, similar meaning, (see Logeion entry for pudibundus, toggling the left-hand column switch to "Inverse") also suggests that De Vaan has it right, the suffix is just -undus.
5 votes

Constructing Latin diminutives

On the model of homō, hominis (stem = homin), the recorded diminutives of which are homullus (< homōnlus) and homunculus, I'd guess abdōmullus or abdōmunculus (update: or maybe abdōmullum or ...
  • 18.3k
5 votes

Is there a prefix, suffix or adjective to indicate that something is the most numerous?

If the original question is about English, it's in the wrong stack. However, if you're looking for a Latin form, I'd like to offer another alternative: taking the noun, making it into an adjective ...
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5 votes
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Is visne > vin unique?

Weiss writes that "The interrogative enclitic particle -ne becomes -n in Plautus when apocope produces an acceptable coda" (p. 147, footnote 79), i.e. *-Vsn- > *-V ̅n- (I.B.8.b, p. 169). He ...
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5 votes
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Is there a suffix in Latin like the "-ization" suffix in English?

There are a few Latin verbs ending in -izare, and they are almost all Greek loanwords. (This list was generated by using the search for “words ending with …” on the Perseus server—do note that it ...
5 votes

-whatever suffix

Quidquid, perhaps? See examples at Wiktionary under quisquis.
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