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18 votes
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Why isn't "Puto deus fio" grammatically incorrect?

In this case I would read puto more as a side remark to the clause deus fio. You could emphasize this with punctuation: Puto: deus fio. I think: I'm becoming a god. The verb puto is indeed ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
7 votes
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Niti and straining for a stool

Concerning your first question, "straining for a stool" has an unambiguous meaning in English. "Straining oneself," on the other hand, can mean any number of things. I'm not sure what else needs to ...
brianpck's user avatar
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7 votes
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Present Participles: can "respicienti" be part of an ablative absolute in this sentence?

As Sumelic says, both -i and -e can be used as the ablative ending of a participle. Even so, mixing them in the same sentence would probably be unusual. Respicienti is really a dative here; the new a....
Cerberus's user avatar
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4 votes
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Switches Between Direct & Indirect Speech in Suetonius-Supplemental

I need a bit more context to come up with an explanation: Cum in crypta, per quam transeundum erat, pueri nobiles ex Asia ad edendas in scaena operas evocati praepararentur, ut eos inspiceret ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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4 votes
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Switches between Direct & Indirect Speech in Suetonius

Strictly speaking, Iovem should be indirect speech, as you say, without quotation marks, because of the accusative. Then it would be translated as follows: ...and that, when Gaius gave Jupiter (as ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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3 votes

Niti and straining for a stool

I know that this question has already been ably answered by @brianpck but I wanted to add a little about the etymology and background of the notion of ‘passing stool’ because it does in fact have ...
Penelope's user avatar
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3 votes

Why isn't "Puto deus fio" grammatically incorrect?

As Joonas noted, puto is parenthetical. I'll just add, by way of comparison, that Claudius's ultima vox in Seneca's Apocolocyntosis was 'vae me, puto, concacavi me.'
cnread's user avatar
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3 votes
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"Communium studiorum commercio" in Suetonius

The Loeb translation seems about right: Alexander Thomson translates the bolded passage in a similar way: on account of our common studies The passage could go any number of ways, but I tend to ...
brianpck's user avatar
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2 votes

"Purissimum penem" in Suetonius's Life of Horace

Yes, Horace, the man who is the purest penis. The word penis when applied to a person indicated someone given to wanton impulses, especially of a sexual nature. For example, from the Satire of Persius:...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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1 vote

Verb forms after "tamquam si"

It possible to read the sentence with fueris having a perfect meaning: "… as if you had dined with me." I read the idea roughly like "I have accepted you as a guest in my house in the past, and ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar

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