17

In this case I would read puto more as a side remark to the clause deus fio. You could emphasize this with punctuation: Puto: deus fio. I think: I'm becoming a god. The verb puto is indeed grammatically detached from the rest of the clause. It is grammatically correct, but it is not really grammatically connected to deus fio. (The semantic connection ...


7

As Sumelic says, both -i and -e can be used as the ablative ending of a participle. Even so, mixing them in the same sentence would probably be unusual. Respicienti is really a dative here; the new a.c.i. (discidisse) has a different construction from the previous one (exclamasse with an ablative absolute Caio dante). The new construction is like Chaerea [...


6

Concerning your first question, "straining for a stool" has an unambiguous meaning in English. "Straining oneself," on the other hand, can mean any number of things. I'm not sure what else needs to be said on this point. Expanding the context of the Suetonius quote makes it pretty clear why this particular meaning is inferred: Statura fuit quadrata, ...


4

Strictly speaking, Iovem should be indirect speech, as you say, without quotation marks, because of the accusative. Then it would be translated as follows: ...and that, when Gaius gave Jupiter (as the password), Chaerea exclaimed... We moderns may be inclined to put Jupiter in quotation marks, lest the passage be read as if Caligula were handing over the ...


4

I need a bit more context to come up with an explanation: Cum in crypta, per quam transeundum erat, pueri nobiles ex Asia ad edendas in scaena operas evocati praepararentur, ut eos inspiceret hortareturque restitit, ac nisi princeps gregis algere se diceret, redire ac repraesentare spectaculum (2) voluit. Duplex dehinc fama est: alii tradunt [here begins ...


2

The Loeb translation seems about right: Alexander Thomson translates the bolded passage in a similar way: on account of our common studies The passage could go any number of ways, but I tend to favor a reading of commercium not so much as (economic) commerce as simply fellowship. Lewis & Short, in its entry for commercium, offers as one meaning: ...


2

I know that this question has already been ably answered by @brianpck but I wanted to add a little about the etymology and background of the notion of ‘passing stool’ because it does in fact have links to Latin, and my entry is too big for a comment! ‘To pass stool’ to mean 'to open one's bowels'*, or ‘stool’ alone to mean a bowel movement, is quite formal ...


2

As Joonas noted, puto is parenthetical. I'll just add, by way of comparison, that Claudius's ultima vox in Seneca's Apocolocyntosis was 'vae me, puto, concacavi me.'


1

It possible to read the sentence with fueris having a perfect meaning: "… as if you had dined with me." I read the idea roughly like "I have accepted you as a guest in my house in the past, and therefore my home is yours". Convictor can mean someone who lives together, but also "table companion" and "familiar friend" are suggested in L&S. Based ...


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