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2

Nihilānus is more correct: all of these words are formed using the stem, not the full word for the first half, so you get mont-ānus (stem mont-) rather than *mons-ānus. And the stem for both nihil and nihilum is just plain nihil. However, this word feels a little weird to me. Nihil is a strange beast in Latin: it's only commonly seen in a few cases, and is ...


4

There are three different sorts of nouns to worry about here! The simplest, and most common, are gendered nouns. These have one form for the masculine, and a different form for the feminine; they're extremely common, since most adjectives work this way, and adjectives can be used freely as nouns. For example, a beautiful man is καλός, while a beautiful ...


3

ὁ παῖς and ἡ παῖς are nouns, but ὁ μαθηματικός (ἀνήρ) and ἡ μαθηματική (γυνή) are adjectives for obvious (omitted) nouns. Mathematics was barely a profession then, so my gut says they would skip ἀνήρ as obvious, but perhaps not γυνή; the LSJ dictionary indicates μαθηματική (ἐπιστήμη) may suggest mathematics, alongside the neutral τὰ μαθηματικά (πράγματα). ...


8

A she-wolf in Greek is ἡ λύκαινα. See, for instance, Plutarch's De Fortuna Romanorum, §8: εἶτα λύκαινα μὲν νεοτόκος σπαργῶσα καὶ πλημμυροῦσα τοὺς μαστοὺς γάλακτι, τῶν σκύμνων ἀπολωλότων, αὐτὴ χρῄζουσα κουφισμοῦ, περιέστειξε τὰ βρέφη καὶ θηλὴν ἐπέσχεν, ὥσπερ ὠδῖνα δευτέραν ἀποτιθεμένη τὴν τοῦ γάλακτος. Translation: There it was that a she-wolf, ...


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