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17

I believe that would be considered very odd. Before certain words, ab is almost never used by any author. Consider for example *ab te, which is found 0 times in the Hewlett-Packard repository. If you replace that with a te, that's 831 results, and 275 for abs te. Similarly, ?ab me gives you only 1 result; it happens to be from Cicero, but I suspect it to be ...


14

The first example that comes to my mind is the beginning of the Second Catilinarian: Tandem aliquando, Quirites, L. Catilinam furentem audacia, scelus anhelantem, pestem patriae nefarie molientem, vobis atque huic urbi ferrum flammamque minitantem, ex urbe vel eiecimus, vel emisimus, vel ipsum egredientem verbis prosecuti sumus. Abiit, excessit, evasit, ...


11

It's not even close. Of the words, only numquam is the right word. As good as Google Translate is for other languages, it's not good at all for Latin. A quick and dirty translation would go something like this: De prosperis numquam somniavi; immo eis laboravi. You have some options for "success," but I think prospera works nicely in the phrase here. ...


11

As you note from the Wikpedia articles, the scholarly consensus is that Caesar did not write these works. The Loeb Classic Library edition to these works and one other (Alexandrian War. African War. Spanish War) gives some brief examples of the reasons for this, noting that doubts can be traced back to the 2nd century A.D. Hirtius would seem a likely next ...


7

Lewis and Short provide some guidance on the limitations of the pre-consonant use of ab: [ab] has become the principal form and the one most generally used through all periods—and indeed the only one used before all vowels and h; here and there also before some consonants, particularly l, n, r, and s; rarely before c, j, d, t; and almost never before the ...


6

I have no hard evidence to support this answer, but I guess that is somewhat inevitable as the question itself feels soft. But it is nevertheless a perfectly valid question, and I hope this answer can at least give some food for thought. On the other hand, medieval or Renaissance texts seem to have a word order that is more similar to modern Romance ...


6

Hic enim dies vobis, patres conscripti, inluxit, haec potestas data est, ut, quantum virtutis, quantum constantiae, quantum gravitatis in huius ordinis consilio esset, populo Romano declarare possetis. — Cicero Phil. V, 2 init. Your question sent me straight to the Philippics. Brutus, after reading this, commenting in this letter to Cicero, thought it ...


6

Similar things do occur in Latin literature, though I know of none that were part of a general tendency of the kind in which you are interested. There are well-known illustrations of snobbery, some of which involve foreigners. Catullus LXXXIV, for example, is a witty offering about misplaced aitches, beginning Chommoda dicebat, si quando commode vellet / ...


6

Here is a relevant passage from the second-century (CE) grammarian Velius Longus: antiquos scimus et abs te dixisse: nos contenti sumus a te dicere. scimus ipsos et ab Lucio dixisse: nos observamus ut [ab] praeponatur his nominibus quae a vocali incipiunt, ut cum dicimus ab Olympo. non adsumitur autem haec b littera, quotiens nomina a consonante incipiunt,...


6

H. J. Rose points to two characteristics of Hyginus's Latin that are considered substandard: "Overworked" relative pronouns Poor translations from Greek Rose gives one example of the "monotonous use" of relative pronouns, from chapter 55 of Fabulae, though he remarks that such use can be found in "almost any passage" of Hyginus: qui cum conatus esset a ...


5

Well, as I read more of Hyginus, I'm beginning to get a sense of at least some places where the Latin feels inelegant. For example, in "Parerga [Herculis]," he writes [Achelous] cum Hercule propter Dejaniræ conjugium cum pugnaret, in taurum se convertit, cui Hercules cornu detraxit, quod cornu Hesperidibus sive Nymphis donavit, quod deæ pomis replerunt et ...


5

The distinction between nihil and nihilum is a very fine one which, no doubt, the Romans learned to apply instinctively. It causes hardly any difficulty in translating from Latin, but in writing idiomatic Latin it does need some care. Nihil (or nil) is an indeclinable substantive having, very simply and without qualification, the pure sense of 'nothing', or ...


4

There are several unrelated grammatical points here, which I'll take in the order in which they occur in your Greek sentence. Position of αὐτούς. The pronoun αὐτ- in its non-emphatic third-person use (as opposed to its emphatic use meaning "himself" etc.) acts basically as a postpositive: it does not stand first in a sentence, nor in a smaller prosodic unit....


4

Aestuans intrinsecus... is a set of fifty couplets by a medieval (1160) poet which purports to be a heart-felt confession but is in fact a boast to his patron. (Is he asking for forgiveness or permission veniam?) Since his patron was an Archdeacon as well as an Arch-Duke, the poet became known as the Arch-Poet, and his poetry is exceptionally well-crafted (...


4

So much the hardest part of your question lies in trying to select something representative of Ovid that I was tempted to reply 'everything and nothing'. Ovid was something of a poet's poet, which is to say that his work is generally of a standard high enough for others to aspire to. In his earlier work he is a source — often the only source — for much of ...


4

The only guidelines I've seen that are related to this issue in any way aren't really about the switch to historic present per se. (Every discussion I've ever seen is in agreement that the historic present is used to add 'vividness.') Instead, the guidelines are related to the appropriate use of the historic present and the historic infinitive; and both sets ...


4

That's quite a leap in logic there. First, people learned Latin in Latin schools, so their style would take after their teacher's, not necessarily the zeitgeist. Second, just because something is influenced by Cicero, does not mean it will be Ciceronian. Medieval Latin survived and was strong all throughout early modern Europe. As for his actual style, ...


4

The embedded story in Apuleius, Metamorphoses IV.28–VI.24 (the so-called 'Tale of Cupid and Psyche') has elements of a fairy tale. It's referred to as belonging to the category of narrationes lepidae anilesque fabulae and begins like this: erant in quadam civitate rex et regina. There were in a certain city a king and a queen. The indefinite quadam ...


4

Chiasms are mostly used in poetry and high rhetoric, for dramatic or or playful effect. What they do is emphasise the words that seem inverted, draw the reader or listener's attention. I would say the frequency and effect of chiasms were not so different from how they are used in the modern languages. I think the 'C' in ABCBA could be anything; it depends ...


4

REGINAM NOLITE OCCIDERE TIMERE BONUM EST SI OMNES CONSENTIUNT EGO NON CONTRADICO - though that one is less about multiple meanings in one word, and more about multiple possible locations for a comma, making the sentence's meaning vacillate between "kill the queen" and "don't kill the queen". There are more examples of these kinds of amiguities, but a ...


3

I offer three small additions to an excellent answer. First, Latin is like most Indo-European languages in that its syntax allows sentences with multiple subordinate clauses. Many other language families do not, e.g. sentences in modern written Chinese contain very few subordinate clauses, but they are often very long. Bureaucratic writers tend to pile up ...


3

Regarding the issue of repetition of intellegit in your third point: There are several terms in Rhetoric for word repetition known to the ancients; the most general is Anaphora. Epizeuxis refers to single word repetition for emphasis, as in, "Listen, friends, Listen." Epanadiplosis is when the repeated word bookends a phrase tying off the point you are ...


3

I could find one example from the Vulgata: 1st book of Samuel, 23:23 (Regum I in Vulgata) Vulgata: Considerate et videte omnia latibula ejus, in quibus absconditur : et revertimini ad me ad rem certam, ut vadam vobiscum. Quod si etiam in terram se abstruserit, perscrutabor eum in cunctis millibus Juda. Douay Rheims: Consider and see all his lurking holes, ...


3

I can't start from the Greek original but, as a translated piece, the first of these seems a bit mechanical, and I prefer the second for style (it's a little shorter, too). This edit has been a long time in coming, but for what it's worth: An opinion on "the quality of the Latin" must take into account various ideas of what that might mean. A principal ...


2

First of all you need to eliminate the article τοὺς, as ἀγαθοὺς is a predicative adjective with nominal value ("we believed that they were good friends" and not "We believed that they were the good friends"); then, given that "good" in that sense means "true" or "loyal", the correct way to translate is with the adjective ἐσθλός (e.g. S. OT 611: φίλον γὰρ ...


2

Both Donatus and Quintillian have chapters in which they describe barbarisms, though the examples areshort, sometimes only one or two words. Donatus: Ars Major, translated Jim Marchand (pdf) lists four types(sic) of mispronunciation and bad usage: adiectio, detractio, inmutatio/ transmutatio litterae, syllabae, temporis (= vowel length) toni, ...


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