14 votes

How to read mathematics out loud?

For basic mathematics, I’ve found some answers in the Institutiones Physicæ by Floriani Dalham, published in 1752: 1+2 = 3 would be read unus plus duo sunt tres Additio est duorum, vel plurium ...
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  • 2,232
13 votes
Accepted

Did ancient Romans raise the intonation of their voices when asking questions?

There is no clear evidence - we simply don't know. Harm Pinkster (Pinkster 2015) writes that even though there may have been something comparable to the falling or rising tone known from many ...
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  • 11.2k
13 votes
Accepted

What were used as "filler" words in Classical Latin?

Surely Cicero and other great orators instructed their pupils to never, ever say <filler word here> when speaking? Strangely enough, they didn't. According to Michael Erard's Um. . .: Slips, ...
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  • 2,492
12 votes

When and how much did Romans speak Greek?

Here is the stub of an answer. There were many, many Greeks in Rome around the turn of the millennium. Many of them were educated slaves, 'imported' to teach Greek to Roman children of the middle and ...
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  • 18.7k
11 votes

In contemporary spoken Latin, do people mark the 1st-declension ablative case?

tl;dr: as the risk of mistake is higher than for other suffixes, in contexts where analyzing the cases is difficult (like chanting psalms in a fast pace) people often distinguish the length less for -...
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  • 1,803
10 votes

What errors did the Greeks typically make in Latin?

Well, here's one example I found: nam contra Graeci adspirare ei solent, ut pro Fundanio Cicero testem qui primam eius litteram dicere non possit inridet. the Greeks on the other hand ...
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  • 8,321
10 votes

How to Practice Speaking Latin

A few comments about pre-requisites to teaching students to speak Latin. Accent Concerning the difficulty to reconstitute the accents of Ancient Latin, the question of "what should be the correct ...
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  • 271
9 votes

How to Practice Speaking Latin

There is some division on opinion whether it is good to practice Latin by making translations from English (or another native language), or better to translate solely from Latin authors. Arguments in ...
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  • 521
8 votes

In contemporary spoken Latin, do people mark the 1st-declension ablative case?

I don't know about the Vatican. But I've met very few people at conventicula, living-Latin events, etc., who make any distinction whatsoever. I don't generally have a problem, I think in part because ...
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8 votes

In contemporary spoken Latin, do people mark the 1st-declension ablative case?

In contemporary spoken Latin in Finnish all vowel quantities are carefully articulated. There is nothing special about the first declension ablative. I have therefore learned to expect it, and it will ...
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8 votes

To what extent there was a difference between written and spoken Latin?

This type of "unsual" word order is often called scrambling. This term includes when modifiers are detached from what they modify (or vice versa) and where grammatical heads and their ...
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  • 2,580
7 votes
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How to introduce a new topic in conversation (like "by the way", "speaking of")?

My suggestion for this purpose is ceterum. See part II.A in the L&S entry for the use of this adverb to introduce something new. The entry in L&S comes with attestations in classical ...
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7 votes
Accepted

Softeners for conversational topic transitions: "Well, …", "So, …"

It seems that nam can be used like this, "to resume the course of thought after a parenthetical interruption". In practice, however, it was hard to find examples that actually capture the full sense ...
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  • 8,321
6 votes

How to Practice Speaking Latin

Evan der Millner of London has a very good site called Latinum and a few Youtube courses which are very good from a conversational perspective. He bases the course on Manesca's Serial and Oral method,...
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6 votes

How to read mathematics out loud?

Partial answer! As far as I can tell, most mathematical discourse would be done in Greek. Latin was used for engineering purposes, but speaking unambiguously about mathematics became rather awkward. ...
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  • 52.7k
6 votes
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Stereotypical Foreign-ness

Similar things do occur in Latin literature, though I know of none that were part of a general tendency of the kind in which you are interested. There are well-known illustrations of snobbery, some ...
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  • 17.5k
5 votes

Spoken Classical Latin

There are lots and lots of recordings around. Check YouTube for Terentius Tunberg and Milena Minkova. Also for Wilifried Stroh, whom I find very entertaining to watch (a series of his lectures in ...
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5 votes

In contemporary spoken Latin, do people mark the 1st-declension ablative case?

I had a Latin teacher who insisted that the long a at the end of ablatives of first declension nouns be pronounced for a noticeably longer time than other vowels. This was the only long vowel she ...
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5 votes

Why is "ita vero" two words?

Latin does not have a word "yes". There are other ways to express the same idea, like the English "exactly", "indeed", "very much so", and so on. From an English point of view, you need some kind of a ...
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4 votes

Why is "ita vero" two words?

In the English phrases "Even so," "More so," or (historical) "Exactly so," 'so' = ita Ita (adverb) so, thus,in this way. (and also by itself) ita C. In affirmations, esp. in replies, yes, it is ...
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  • 8,457
4 votes
Accepted

Are there attestations of Greco-Latin contact languages from antiquity?

J.N.Adams discusses this in Bilingualism and the Latin language. According to the author, there are examples of imperfect Greek and Latin by second language speakers, but not evidence of a pidgin ...
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4 votes

Informal ways of expressing gratitude (and replying to the same) in Latin?

Some examples: From the Assinaria: Democles: Bene hercle facitis ... (Well, thanks by god!) From the Aulularia: Megadorus: Habeo gratiam. (Thanks) From the Captivi: Philocrates: ...
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  • 3,044
4 votes

How can the use of "-aeus" as an adjective suffix in "Herculaeus" be explained?

The adjective Herculeus is well attested in Classical Latin. I think “Herculaeus” is merely a bad spelling in Mediaeval or Humanistic Latin.
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  • 15.9k
3 votes

Why is "ita vero" two words?

As an aside, the Italian and Spanish (and to an extent French) “si” come from “sic” (thus) while French “oui” Comes via a roundabout route from “hoc ille” (thus he). It seems that Latin had quite a ...
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3 votes

Spoken Classical Latin

I cannot state well enough how much I have learned from Luke Ranieri. He is a polyglot, speaking numerous languages, and is fluent in both Ancient Greek and Latin. Some good videos to get started: ...
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  • 3,091
3 votes

How to Practice Speaking Latin

Salve! 1) Rereading: One of the best speakers I know, Daniel Petterson from Latinitium, read, and reread (and reread and reread) the works of Plautus and Terence. It basically comes down to a lot ...
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  • 31
2 votes

Stereotypical Foreign-ness

Both Donatus and Quintillian have chapters in which they describe barbarisms, though the examples areshort, sometimes only one or two words. Donatus: Ars Major, translated Jim Marchand (pdf) lists ...
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  • 8,457
2 votes

Softeners for conversational topic transitions: "Well, …", "So, …"

Porro (Lewis and Short) I Literally straight on, directly II Transf. 2. In partic., in discourse. a. In the progress of an argument, or in a sequence of ideas, then, next, furthermore, ...
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  • 8,457
1 vote

How can the use of "-aeus" as an adjective suffix in "Herculaeus" be explained?

As far as I can tell, the answer that fdb provided to my question is completely correct; I just wanted to add some relevant information that I discovered recently when I was studying the inflection of ...
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  • 21.8k
1 vote

Softeners for conversational topic transitions: "Well, …", "So, …"

This answer is based on what I would do in Latin, not on any rule I know. It depends on context. If you have both been silent for a while, then the introductory word indicates that you are about to ...
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