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4

Does Latin allow the letter k in suffixed words? It doesn't, because Latin doesn't allow the letter K at all. Well, almost; there are a couple of words with K and they mostly have spelling variants with C. In particular, the words you mention are never spelled with a K in Latin. I have never seen K within a Latin word, only at the beginning. (Perhaps there ...


6

Here is a nice list of Latin cardinal, ordinal, adverbial and distributive numerals going from 1 to 1,000,000 (continuously to 1,000, then with gaps): https://www.arndt-bruenner.de/mathe/scripts/numeraliatab.htm Ignore the German translations in the first three rows. Each rows starts with the number in Arabic, then in Roman digits, followed by the Latin ...


6

For numbers between 100 and 1000 you can just take the components out of the Wikipedia table you found. ascendit Simon Petrus et traxit rete in terram plenum magnis piscibus centum quinquaginta tribus (153 - note the declension) et cum tanti essent non est scissum rete (John 21:11, Vulgata) et fratres eius principes patrum ducenti quadraginta duo (242)...


8

The Appendix Probi reveals errors of both types, i.e. of orthography and pronunciation. The sources for the content of the Appendix are written (as Barnett notes below), but, as such, they must be understood as reflecting habits of pronunciation. In the article “The ‘Appendix Probi’ as a Compendium of Popular Latin: Description and Bibliography”, the ...


2

One of your conclusions is, I feel, justified: that the j in hujus is due to it being pronounced as a consonant/semivowel, since that was always the case. More than that: from Classical times (and actually earlier than that) almost all instances of consonantal i between vowels were geminated, since intervocalic short /j/ was lost at an earlier stage (e.g. ...


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