10

I apologize if this comes across as a non-answer, but I cannot help giving it. I have translated several songs into Latin for professional singers. Good translations take a lot of work: I make sure the singer is comfortable with the translation. I add or remove syllables or avoid words they find awkward for some reason. I make the rhyme, alliteration, and ...


9

Actually, I disagree: this sentence does have a coherent meaning in Latin, if my parsing is correct. Rather than as a noun, I read comploratus as the past participle of comploro which has attested forms of taking the accusative (see the first example in the linked entry). It is rare and post-Augustinian, but it is not incorrect. The rest is not hard to put ...


7

Your motto made me recall Ovid's famous line: Donec eris felix multos numerabis amicos. As long as you are happy you will have many friends. Imitating this and holding on to hexameter, I arrived at this suggestion: Donec eris mihi par poteris tibi vivere liber. As long as you are my equal you can live your own life free. This is not exactly what ...


7

The following phrase should suit you just fine if your desire is an entirely literal translation, rather than something more pragmatic: Lībertās nūlla dōnec aequālēs sumus. or Lībertātem nūllam habēbimus dōnec aequālēs sumus. Which translates literally to: No freedom until we are equal. We shall have no freedom until we are equal. I ...


6

Decorus is an adjective that means, in this context, "decorated, ornamented, adorned; elegant, fine, beautiful, handsome." In this case, it is substantivized, "beautiful one." Valde is the adverb form of validus ("strong") and can be used with a verb, adjective, or adverb to intensify it. It's essentially a glorified way of saying "very." The whole bolded ...


5

Perhaps you meant Salve Britannia, Regina nobilis, ...floreat which can be translated as Hail Britannia, noble Queen, ... may [she] prosper (thanks to draconis for correcting an earlier error). Salve is an expression of praise, or welcoming, or goodbye. Nobilis can mean noble, but also famous. So you would need the full context to asses the exact ...


5

The first two lines are not second person plural. They are absolute ablatives (one for each line) and therefore "impersonal". The first line has confutare (silence) and maledictus (cursed) and reads roughly "When the cursed ones are silenced". The second line also has implicitly maledictis and the other part of the absolute ablative is the participle ...


5

Alas, @Tendero, I'm afraid that prodigia comploratus silens oro regnet exitium doesn't have a coherent meaning as a Latin expression. Comploratus silens means something like "silent lamentation," but there isn't any way for prodigia (which means "wonders" or "miracles") to go along with it grammatically—"silent lamentation of wonders" would work in English ...


5

Let us first start with Luke. In pax hominibus bonae voluntatis the word hominibus is not ablative but dative. The two forms look alike here, but context reveals the intended case. It means "to the people". Therefore I would offer this translation: Et in terra pax hominibus bonae voluntatis And on Earth peace to people of good will It seems that the ...


4

As you say, the ablative absolute is translated freely, as an imperative. But that is completely normal, because, in a liberal/literary translation, any participial construction can be translated as a paratactic (parallel) clause to the main clause, so you'd get two parallel imperatives. So all those translations you posted of the abl. abs. are perfectly ...


4

Here is my take on the lyrics: Non secubo, cum memoriis vivo, maerore domo, haec mi vera libertas. Some background: I found something with matching lyrics on YouTube and guessed that this might be the song you are interested in. I made sure the translation is actually singable. The rhythm of the original is fairly free, but it does exist. Not ...


4

The key to a good translation is getting not just the literal meaning, but the sense of the words across. So I'm going to skip over fairly unambiguous words like "this" and "heart", as well as the grammar, and just focus on the more interesting words. Old Senia doesn't feel quite right. To me, senex describes a person, not an object. &...


4

First, note that in omnibus can't mean "into everything" but only "in everything, in all things". I would take Vernales as beginning a new sentence that goes on to mores, with those two words together meaning "springtime customs". The reason I think Vernales does not actually go with flores, as it would seem to at first sight, is that Medieval Latin poetry ...


4

Indeed the singers pronounce lucem as /luˈkɛːm/, but their pronunciation is actually inconsistent, e.g. vince is [ˈvɪŋ.kɛ] (neither Classical nor Ecclesiastical), and "ae" is pronounced [e] in praesta but also [ae̯] in iunctae. The description of this video gives the correct lyrics: it is not lude! but certa! (struggle!, strive!).


4

The first comma is just phrasing in the tune; it doesn't add to the sense. It may have been 'Salve Britanniae Regina gracilis, ..floreat nobilis (God) save you, gracious Queen of Britain; may she flourish the noble... Just for comparison, a completely different Latin version of the National Anthem is given at latinisedhymns.org. And here, poems to the ...


3

One of the fans wrote this down timebam me te invenire oculis tuis me perlegentem et quid viri sim timebam me de te perire amore eum primum I can add that the second verse is a repeat. That the third verse contains the word semper, (always). It means, roughly, "I was afraid that I would find you reading me thoroughly with your eyes, and ...


3

A valid translation of the relevant piece would be: O most (lit. very) beautiful [Lady]! Decora is an adjective, feminine in gender (see meaning II for the beautiful sense). Valde is an intensity adverb making decora an augmentative (i.e., very beautiful). The relevant part of the definition is: Not sure about the punctuation, but the noun is either ...


3

Is seems odd to me even to suggest that hominibus might be the ablative/instrumental case, The Gloria is hardly the greatest work of art from any point of view, but simple balance alone—gloria Deo in excelsis||pax hominibus in terra—would put God and men in the dative. Besides, pax/peace is a state, and pax hominibus(abl) would be meaningless. The important ...


3

I'm only a beginner with Latin, but, inspired by Middle School Historian, I'm posting an attempt: Solitarius non sum, Memoriis comitantibus habito. Desiderium domus est mihi, Ecce Eleutheria vera mea.


2

I'll offer another translation that is fact not mine at all, but a translation of someone else (whose abilities I respect) on the Usenet group alt.language.latin where this same question came up about a year ago: Stay with us O Lord shine [your] light on us, with darkness of mind dispelled, fill the world with sweetness.


2

My impression is that both translations got the third line wrong and the fourth line right. Pulsa mentis caligine 1. Dispel the darkness of the mind 2. Send away the darkness from the mind The two translations are essentially identical. The other three lines of the last stanza each contain a clear imperative, so both translators have treated pulsa ...


2

I'm no expert (just a kid who's interested in the language), but I think I could translate this. Solus non sum, cum memoriis convivo, paenitudo domus mea est, hoc est libertas vera mea.


2

Here's an uneducated guess, based on an evening's googling. Iam mutantur An earlier version of the poem appears in the Carmina Burana, §105 in this book but usually counted §142: Tempus adest floridum, Surgunt namque flores, Vernales mox in omnibus Iam mutantur mores. You have to fudge Vernales to fit the melody, which seems strange, but another source ...


2

Here is an option worth considering: Perhaps imitare is meant as a non-deponent verb, making imitantur passive. Thus imitantur mores would be read as something like "the traditions are followed". Then the stanza would consist of three independent statements separated by commas: Tempus adest floridum surgunt namque flores vernales in omnibus imitantur mores ...


2

I agree with cnread that capitalization seems to follow the verses, not implying a hidden punctuation. I also think that mores is the object of imitantur, the subject being flores. This, IMO, has two readings: Flores imitantur mores [suos], as cnread says, they imitate their custom. Flores imitantur mores [bonos], they flourish, just as virtues do. I admit ...


1

Here's a second uneducated guess, based on yet more googling. Imitantur is being used impersonally, referring to things in general, with the object mores vernales. In omnibus here means "in all respects". Impersonal passive Quoting note 149 of this guide to De Bello Civili: The impersonal passive is often, very effectively, used in Latin to give ...


1

Looking for a relevant rendering of this Latin phrase, starting with a significant "Et", I was wondering why no one hadn't come up with "Also" or "Too". A Latin sentence beginning with Et usually has this particular meaning. If peace is considered as a promised state in heaven, this phrase might as well be meant as a call for peace on earth. Furthermore, in ...


1

I like the suggestions Draconis gave, and I have some ideas to add. Uninvited: When trouble comes uninvited, it comes against your will. This is conveyed well with an absolute ablative me invito. (The word ultro seems weird. I am not sure what you were aiming at with it.) Apart: I would not use any Latin adverb to translate "apart" here. (Separatim means ...


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