11 votes
Accepted

Va, pensiero, sull'ali dorate – in Latin?

You can listen to the whole chorus being sung in Latin here (be sure to enable Latin subtitles). The performer is Roland Kadan, an Austrian Latin teacher who has published a whole Latin songbook. He ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
10 votes

Composer requesting help with a perfect translation

I apologize if this comes across as a non-answer, but I cannot help giving it. I have translated several songs into Latin for professional singers. Good translations take a lot of work: I make sure ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
9 votes

Translation of the Latin lyrics in Avenged Sevenfold's "Requiem"?

Actually, I disagree: this sentence does have a coherent meaning in Latin, if my parsing is correct. Rather than as a noun, I read comploratus as the past participle of comploro which has attested ...
brianpck's user avatar
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9 votes
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Translation of lucis mortiat / reginae gloriae

There is not much to clarify in the first line, mortiat is not proper Latin. One might imagine a word like mortire, but the sentence would still not parse. Proper if perhaps not idiomatic Latin would ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
7 votes

Parsing "Vale, o valde decóra" in the Ave Regina Caelorum

Decorus is an adjective that means, in this context, "decorated, ornamented, adorned; elegant, fine, beautiful, handsome." In this case, it is substantivized, "beautiful one." Valde is the adverb ...
brianpck's user avatar
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7 votes

Translation of a Macklemore lyric

Your motto made me recall Ovid's famous line: Donec eris felix multos numerabis amicos. As long as you are happy you will have many friends. Imitating this and holding on to hexameter, I arrived ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
7 votes

Translation of a Macklemore lyric

The following phrase should suit you just fine if your desire is an entirely literal translation, rather than something more pragmatic: Lībertās nūlla dōnec aequālēs sumus. or Lībertātem ...
Ethan Bierlein's user avatar
6 votes

"Et in terra pax hominibus bona voluntas" [sic!]

Let us first start with Luke. In pax hominibus bonae voluntatis the word hominibus is not ablative but dative. The two forms look alike here, but context reveals the intended case. It means "to the ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes

Latin words remembered from high school 50 years ago

The first comma is just phrasing in the tune; it doesn't add to the sense. It may have been 'Salve Britanniae Regina gracilis, ..floreat nobilis (God) save you, gracious Queen of Britain; may she ...
Hugh's user avatar
  • 8,683
5 votes

Latin words remembered from high school 50 years ago

Perhaps you meant Salve Britannia, Regina nobilis, ...floreat which can be translated as Hail Britannia, noble Queen, ... may [she] prosper (thanks to draconis for correcting an earlier error)....
luchonacho's user avatar
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5 votes
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16th stanza of Dies irae

The first two lines are not second person plural. They are absolute ablatives (one for each line) and therefore "impersonal". The first line has confutare (silence) and maledictus (cursed) and reads ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Translation of the Latin lyrics in Avenged Sevenfold's "Requiem"?

Alas, @Tendero, I'm afraid that prodigia comploratus silens oro regnet exitium doesn't have a coherent meaning as a Latin expression. Comploratus silens means something like "silent lamentation," but ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
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4 votes

Can someone help me translate these lyrics into Latin please?

Here is my take on the lyrics: Non secubo, cum memoriis vivo, maerore domo, haec mi vera libertas. Some background: I found something with matching lyrics on YouTube and guessed that this ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes

Any suggestions for translating a verse from an American Song

The key to a good translation is getting not just the literal meaning, but the sense of the words across. So I'm going to skip over fairly unambiguous words like "this" and "heart",...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes

Two possible translations of a hymn: which is most likely right?

As you say, the ablative absolute is translated freely, as an imperative. But that is completely normal, because, in a liberal/literary translation, any participial construction can be translated as a ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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4 votes

How does one "imitate into everything"?

First, note that in omnibus can't mean "into everything" but only "in everything, in all things". I would take Vernales as beginning a new sentence that goes on to mores, with those two words ...
TKR's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

Issues with the lyrics of the UEFA Nations League anthem

Indeed the singers pronounce lucem as /luˈkɛːm/, but their pronunciation is actually inconsistent, e.g. vince is [ˈvɪŋ.kɛ] (neither Classical nor Ecclesiastical), and "ae" is pronounced [e] in praesta ...
Vincenzo Oliva's user avatar
4 votes

Latin in Popular Music

I'm not sure that this answer covers what you were aiming for, but I could not resist posting this as an answer. This YouTube channel has several Latin covers of popular songs. Here is a recent cover ...
d_e's user avatar
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4 votes

What are the Latin lyrics to Ringo Starr's "Pax Um Biscum (Peace Be With You)"

The lyrics seem to be a corruption of: Pax Vobiscum This means, "Peace be with you." The subsequent lyrics of the song confirm this. Though this particular phrase doesn't occur in the ...
brianpck's user avatar
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4 votes

Translation of lucis mortiat / reginae gloriae

To add on to Sebastian's answer, ad is primarily for motion, and should not be confused with an indirect object. It's the 'to' as in 'to/for' (I gave him the ball, I gave the ball to him), and not 'to/...
cmw's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

What are two lines from the Bee-Gee's song, "Don't Forget to Remember Me", in Latin?

First line According to the entry for oblivisci in L&S, the verb can be used with other verbs in two ways: with the infinitive (I.δ) or with a relative clause (I.ε). The infinitive is the best fit ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Seeking feedback on English to Latin song translation

I don't know how much you want changed, so I'll just tackle your two questions for now. What about: Super omnia amorem desideras, "You desire love above all." (cf. Aeneid 9.283) Is there a ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 54.6k
4 votes

"And I am done with my graceless heart..."

A few notes: Exsecare seems a good fit. Excidere would also be an option. Ita is not correct (it answers to quomodo), it should be itaque (or quare for example, there are many possibilities). I also ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
4 votes

Was vowel quantity observed when singing?

Welcome to the site! Since no one has ventured an answer, I will attempt a partial one. I know of no songs preserved from the age of classic Latin, but have not looked into the matter to know whether ...
Vegawatcher's user avatar
  • 2,700
4 votes

Clericulus = altar boy?

The more likely meaning is "choirboys." When clergy are positioned as singers and listeners in Latin song, they are typically identified by the plural cleri or the diminutive clericuli (...
alphabet's user avatar
  • 335
3 votes

Seraphin song lyrics help

One of the fans wrote this down timebam me te invenire oculis tuis me perlegentem et quid viri sim timebam me de te perire amore eum primum I can add that the second verse is a repeat....
Hugh's user avatar
  • 8,683
3 votes
Accepted

Parsing "Vale, o valde decóra" in the Ave Regina Caelorum

A valid translation of the relevant piece would be: O most (lit. very) beautiful [Lady]! Decora is an adjective, feminine in gender (see meaning II for the beautiful sense). Valde is an intensity ...
Rafael's user avatar
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3 votes

"Et in terra pax hominibus bona voluntas" [sic!]

Is seems odd to me even to suggest that hominibus might be the ablative/instrumental case, The Gloria is hardly the greatest work of art from any point of view, but simple balance alone—gloria Deo in ...
JRMD's user avatar
  • 31
3 votes
Accepted

Mr Bean's Latin lyrics

I think you are correct that "Vale homo qui es faba" would be grammatical. A noun following "Vale" is frequently in the vocative form, sometimes in the nominative form, based on ...
Asteroides's user avatar

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