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17

It is always difficult to make this kind of charts. I think that the best thing that has been done on Latin over the last decades was to start studying it from a more linguistic point of view. By linguistic approach I mean, among other things, the following: Studying Latin within its linguistic environment, i.e. that of the Old Italic languages (Faliscan, ...


13

We know that meter existed because Aristotle in his Poetics flatly tells us so. Moreover, we have quite a bit of testimony from ancient grammarians like Quintilian and Victorinus, whose work on meters is most informative. We also have poets' own words about their meters, such as Catullus mentioning his hendecasyllabi or Ovid writing aobut how Cupid stole a ...


13

The first example that comes to my mind is the beginning of the Second Catilinarian: Tandem aliquando, Quirites, L. Catilinam furentem audacia, scelus anhelantem, pestem patriae nefarie molientem, vobis atque huic urbi ferrum flammamque minitantem, ex urbe vel eiecimus, vel emisimus, vel ipsum egredientem verbis prosecuti sumus. Abiit, excessit, evasit, ...


9

The PHI Classical Latin Texts Database http://latin.packhum.org The Packard Humanities Institute provides free access to Latin Litterature texts from the beginning to ~200 AD. There are currently two functions for searching through the database. It can be involved by using some keywords : You can refine a search with logical operators. & and | or ...


7

It may be apposite to say that, for five modern works of varying styles translated into Latin, I turned a total of 295,700 words of English into 212,300 of Latin. This represents a surprisingly consistent diminution to some 72% overall, with a range of 70.8 to 72.3%. This would correspond to an increase of 40%, if instead the Latin had been converted into ...


6

Hic enim dies vobis, patres conscripti, inluxit, haec potestas data est, ut, quantum virtutis, quantum constantiae, quantum gravitatis in huius ordinis consilio esset, populo Romano declarare possetis. — Cicero Phil. V, 2 init. Your question sent me straight to the Philippics. Brutus, after reading this, commenting in this letter to Cicero, thought it ...


6

This is a meta-answer on How to find Latin corpora? Go to the Virtual Language Observatory (run by the European Union financed CLARIN project), search all resources and restrict the search to Latin Language and Resource type Corpus. On the day of writing this answer, this search yields 26 hits. The corpora are of very different nature and often contain ...


6

I'm an experienced chant singer, so I do have some first-hand knowledge about what might be going on here. 1) The clarity of words in chant is important. But the problem for listeners is that the resonance of the spaces in which chant is usually sung/recorded is so great as to obscure even well-enunciated consonants, especially when you have multiple ...


6

I am a novice student of Latin. I found the following summary from the Department of the Classics at the University of Illinois in Urbana - Champaign rewarding. I've reproduced it here in part, and highlighted in bold some of the parts that I believe address your request. I note this is not my personal nor anecdotal experience. Why Study Latin? 1) ...


5

W. Sidney Allen in Vox Latina says that various grammarians such as Quintilian stated the rules quite unambiguously (although he also writes that "there is some controversy about the nature of the historical accent"). However, even if we didn't have precise statements from ancient grammarians, the rules could pretty easily deduced simply from the reflexes ...


5

It takes a long time to master Latin poetry, and a lot of practice in reading before you can attempt to write it. The metrical schemes are not hard to follow, but declaiming the poems as the classical poets intended is just about impossible, since we can only guess at the true sounds. The big difference from modern European, as you probably know, is that ...


5

The Latine version of Wikisource Wikisource can be a good idea, as I think its code is pretty good standardized — as an illustration, books can be exported in many formats with this (experimental) feature: http://tools.wmflabs.org/wsexport/tool/book.php. Furthermore, the corpus isn’t limited to classical Latin (there you can find works of Newton for ...


4

I suggest contacting the folks at various organs and organizations. Jason Pedicone at Paideia, somebody at the Vivarium Novum, Terence Tunberg, Nancy Llewellyn, the ALF, Reginald Foster, Gaius Licoppe, Roberto Carfagni, etc. I'm not sure any of them will be able to give you bounds on either side, but I'd bet that all of them together might give you a decent ...


4

The only thing I can suggest is to become a regular reader of the standard specialist journals. A good start would be with these ones: https://www.jstor.org/publisher/classical


4

The Latin Library is one possibility. It is very light, consisting of simple HTML pages with no unnecessary features. There are no additional features, just the Latin texts. Some might argue that also necessary features are missing, but that is always a matter of taste. The corpus has a large collection of texts which can be found following the links. There ...


4

REGINAM NOLITE OCCIDERE TIMERE BONUM EST SI OMNES CONSENTIUNT EGO NON CONTRADICO - though that one is less about multiple meanings in one word, and more about multiple possible locations for a comma, making the sentence's meaning vacillate between "kill the queen" and "don't kill the queen". There are more examples of these kinds of amiguities, but a ...


4

So much the hardest part of your question lies in trying to select something representative of Ovid that I was tempted to reply 'everything and nothing'. Ovid was something of a poet's poet, which is to say that his work is generally of a standard high enough for others to aspire to. In his earlier work he is a source — often the only source — for much of ...


3

Had you considered Adelard of Bath? His translation of Euclid (from Arabic) and his treatise on the Astrolabe (written for William II) are both significant. "Various questions" is a bit long-winded but pithy compared to Newton. His book on falconry is based on observation and best practice and was addressed to High-school students. You would not have to ...


2

Subscription only (available mostly to institutions): Brill Online Reference Works De Gruyter (includes Journal of Latin Linguistics and excellent New Perspectives on Historical Latin Syntax four-volume series, among other things) John Benjamins Oxford Scholarship Online databases, like ProQuest and EBSCO Free: Academia


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