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9 votes
Accepted

When should nūllus be singular vs plural?

Uncountable nouns will always take the singular, except when they're being thought of as multiple discrete units. For instance, magna pecunia = a vast sum of money, whereas magnae pecuniae = several ...
Kingshorsey's user avatar
  • 6,676
9 votes
Accepted

Why Does Cicero use the Third-Person Singular Instead of the Plural Form?

Cicero does this more than once. In addition to what you found in De oratore, we have ea ratio atque doctrina (also in De oratore) and ratio et doctrina praescripserit (in De natura deorum) ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

In “word x is case y”, what dictates the verb’s number?

I didn't find too many examples, but based on what I've seen, I'd expect "pāstōrem et ovem accūsātīvī singulārēs sunt" (or "accūsātīvī sunt singulārēs") to be a possible wording. A ...
Asteroides's user avatar
  • 29.3k
6 votes

First Declension Singular, Gen or Dat?

Welcome to the site! The short answer is that without context, many translations of terrae are possible: e.g., "of land," "to land," "lands," "of the land," &...
Vegawatcher's user avatar
  • 2,710
6 votes

First Declension Singular, Gen or Dat?

Context will answer that question for you. If you say "lands" by itself in English you will likely think of it first in the nominative. In a sentence, though, you might say of the lands, to ...
Adam's user avatar
  • 8,622
4 votes
Accepted

Why is "promissum" (singular) used here and not "promissa" (plural)?

A promissum, -i is a frequently substantivized perfect passive participle of promitto. In this sense, it's just a "promise," and facere promissum is one way of saying, "to keep [not ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 41.5k
3 votes

Why is "promissum" (singular) used here and not "promissa" (plural)?

It's absolutely them making a promise, promissum. This is the object of the ACI. The infinitive of the ACI is facturos esse and the subject (in accusative) is eos. The object of this verb in ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
1 vote

Does a general rule for forming Locative Singular exist?

I was never taught that the locative was formed using another case, but I am aware many grammar books refer to a genitive-locative (or other cases) that is just an artefact used maybe as help to ...
Davide's user avatar
  • 175

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