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13 votes

Can someone help translating "one must die for one to live"

One possibility: necesse est alterum mori ut alter vivat. It's necessary that one (of the two) die in order that the other live. A variation: ut alter vivat necesse est ut alter moriatur. In order ...
cnread's user avatar
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12 votes

How can I properly translate possessive form of nouns?

In general, don't focus on every word having an equivalent in the other language. For example, the single word magistrō would generally be translated into multiple words like "to the master"....
Draconis's user avatar
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7 votes

Can someone help translating "one must die for one to live"

Here's another, more concise option: Alteri moriendum ut alter vivat. This uses a different way of expressing "must" than cnread's translations, but means basically the same thing. You ...
TKR's user avatar
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6 votes
Accepted

"Claudius pullos sacros in aquam mersit ut biberent, quoniam esse nollent"

There is no mysteriously obscure grammar at play here, but rather the infinitive esse from the verb edo 'I eat'. He made the chickens drink, because they didn't want to eat.
consistebat's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

What is the exact translation of "Frusta me natum"

You mistyped it. The word in question is actually frustra, and is an adverb meaning "in vain" or, as that translator put it, "pointlessly." The sentence is indirect speech within ...
cmw's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

Cafaea pignerā est — the coffee is pledged?

First, the verb form you need is the perfect participle (in the nominative singular feminine). This is also what iacta is in alea iacta est, the perfect participle of iacere. In your case that would ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
4 votes

Can someone help translating "one must die for one to live"

In Italian we use the concise latin expression mors tua, vita mea to describe self-defence (both literal or figurative). In your case you may want to adjust the pronouns - mors alicuius, vita alius ...
moonwave99's user avatar
3 votes

Latin translation of "Killing in the name of"

Too long for a comment, so... Comments have indicated that killing is a noun, or rather a gerund. Thus the verb form occidere might not be appropriate. The noun form is occisio. You have also ...
Andrew Leach's user avatar
3 votes

If the laws of physics no longer apply in the future, god help you

A 'literal' translation could be: si quando leges physicae valere desiverint, dominus te adiuvet. 'If ever the laws of physics will have ceased to apply (to be valid), may God help you.' However, as ...
cnread's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

"hōc enim ūnō modō...scelus" or "hoc enim ūnō modō...scelus" ? (Ritchie's Fabulae faciles, §20)

Both readings are plausible and the essential message is the same, so the choice of interpretation might not even show up in a translation. The distinction is there, but my first point is to encourage ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
2 votes

"hōc enim ūnō modō...scelus" or "hoc enim ūnō modō...scelus" ? (Ritchie's Fabulae faciles, §20)

I think hōc here goes with modo. I would translate as "for in this way alone could such a deed be atoned for." However, I guess it could go with scelus also, like Cicero's "hoc tantum ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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2 votes

Latin translation for school motto "Growing "Stronger"

New Suggestion Edit: I have a better idea. (And now, Sebastian has beat me to the punch.) I would actually recommend using robur as your root, which means "hard wood", including that of an ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 55.5k
2 votes

If the laws of physics no longer apply in the future, god help you

I'd go for something like: Si physicæ leges non amplius operabuntur, auxiliet te Deus The key points here are the following: I think physicæ could arguably also be phisicæ artis, since the laws ...
Rafael's user avatar
  • 11.5k
2 votes

If the laws of physics no longer apply in the future, god help you

While others probably have better thoughts on "the laws of physics", "no longer" has a fairly straightforward translation: nōn jam. And while auxiliāre is a common word for "...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.6k
1 vote

Latin translation for school motto "Growing "Stronger"

If your school is all oak-themed, it seems apt to find a translation based on the adjective robustus, which means “firm, strong, robust” etc., but in the most literal sense, “made of oak, oaken.” So ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Latin translation of "Killing in the name of"

Latin doesn't have a preposition "of". To express the genitive, you need to inflect the word. For example, "of Carthago" is Carthaginis and "of stadium" is stadii. You ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar

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