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14 votes
Accepted

How would you say "body" as in when stating a law of physics?

Yes, corpus is correct for "body" in the sense used in physics. That is the word Newton used in his laws of motion: Corpus omne perseverare in statu suo quiescendi vel movendi uniformiter ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
13 votes

What are the Greek or Latin words for these SI prefixes?

From an article on the adoption of the newest prefixes (Q, R, q, r) in 2022: "The only letters that were not used for other units or other symbols were R and Q," Brown said. Convention ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
10 votes
Accepted

Difficult sentence from Leibniz's Historia Inventionis Phosphori?

The relatio is further qualified as discedens and hausta. Specifically, it is “in not a few places” (iisque capitalibus, “and the main ones”) a re gesta discedens (deviating from the history), ex ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
8 votes

What are the Greek or Latin words for these SI prefixes?

As you note, the tera- prefix comes from the Greek word for monster. But it also happens to be quite similar to tetra-, which is of course the Greek-derived prefix for four. The next step up from ...
BenM's user avatar
  • 181
6 votes

Is Pluto a planet(a)?

In the context of ancient astronomical theory a “planet” or “wandering star” is any heavenly body that changes its apparent location in relation to the other stars, as opposed to “fixed stars”, which ...
fdb's user avatar
  • 17.9k
5 votes

Is the inflection of the Latin words in today's science similar to that of classical Latin, or English?

Words used in a Latin context are inflected as Latin, and words used in an English context are inflected as English. While people might pluralize "nucleus" as "nuclei", nobody says ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.6k
2 votes

How should particle names ending in -on be treated in Latin?

I will post some arguments in support of the electrōn, electrōnis (m.) convention. It seems to effectively avoid ambiguity for most forms: electrōn, electrōnis, electrōnī, electrōnem, electrōne, ...
Asteroides's user avatar
  • 29.3k
2 votes

How should particle names ending in -on be treated in Latin?

A contrarian suggestion: recall the conference in 1932 where two kinds of “neutron” were discussed, and Fermi said (in Italian) “let's call the heavy one neutrone and the little one neutrino,” ...
Anton Sherwood's user avatar
1 vote

Is Kant's "De Mundi Sensibilis atque Intelligibilis Forma et Principiis" available online in its Latin original?

I found a scanned copy here: https://books.google.com/books?id=3TwjJn1hjIwC&newbks=1&newbks_redir=0&dq=De%20mundi%20sensibilis%20atque%20intelligibilis%20forma%20et%20principiis&pg=PA2#...
Andrew C's user avatar

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