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18

This answer has been percolating in my head for a couple of months now. Given that there haven't been any other attempts to answer it, I've posted it but realise its limitations in providing a clear answer to your question. It also does not speak at all to the question of Jansenism. This is a great question but one that, unfortunately, has no simple (or ...


11

For basic mathematics, I’ve found some answers in the Institutiones Physicæ by Floriani Dalham, published in 1752: 1+2 = 3 would be read unus plus duo sunt tres Additio est duorum, vel plurium Numerorum in unum collectio. Indicatur per signum + adjectum, id est : plus. (…) Dicatur : 4+2+2+7 sunt 15 (Caput III, p. 26) 1-2 = -1 would be read unus ...


10

Yes, depending on the type of wall. Rūpēs, -is is a third-declension feminine noun derived from rumpō "break, split". It means a rock which is split apart or has a smooth face; I've seen it translated as "cliff", "canyon", or just plain "rock" (e.g. rūpēs Tarpeia is "the Tarpeian Rock"). Rectus, -a, -um started as the past participle of regō "to keep ...


10

19th Century Scientific Latin An example: Gauss From G. Waldo Dunnington's 2004 biography of Gauss, Carl Friedrich Gauss: Titan of Science, p. 37-8: … Of unusual interest is the part which Meyerhoff⁶ took in this book [sc. Gauss's most important mathematical work: the Disquisitiones arithmeticæ]—the correction of the Latin. ⁶Johann Heinrich Jakob ...


9

There is one word that seems to fit the bill: quoad. Although this word has a temporal ("as long as") and spatial ("as far as") meaning, Lewis and Short also gives the following meaning: B.3: With respect to, as to It also suggests that it derives from quod attinet ad. An interesting note is that all three classical examples given are dubious readings, ...


8

Since a rainbow is a gradient, there's still no way of knowing which hue a color word refers to. At best we can approximate. Earl Anderson's Folk-Taxonomies in Early English has a good discussion if it (citing Dronke 1974), along with this neat chart: However, there are quite a few butcherings of the Greek, so I recommend you jump straight to Edmund ...


7

The Online Etymology Dictionary gives this description for the etymology of boron: Originally called boracium by Humphrey Davy because it was drawn from boracic acid. So that form was originally used by the discoverer of boron. I think it is fair to assume that borium is just a simple Latinization of boron. Azote was the original name coined for the ...


6

The earliest writings on what might be called ‘real science’ begin in the seventeenth century. They were in Latin because it was a lingua franca, widely understood across Europe. Among the greatest exemplars were Isaac Newton and Karl Friedrich Gauss (another interesting case is that of William Harvey, who wrote De Motu Cardis). It’s interesting to read ...


6

The best search terms I've found are trabs, -is and chasma, -atis. Literally meaning a wooden beam, trabs was applied by both Pliny and Seneca to something which might be the aurora (though L&S say it was probably a meteor). Pliny's Natural History II.26-7: Emicant et trabes simili modo, quas δοκους vocant [...] fit et caeli ipsius hiatus, quod ...


5

Partial answer! As far as I can tell, most mathematical discourse would be done in Greek. Latin was used for engineering purposes, but speaking unambiguously about mathematics became rather awkward. For example, Vitruvius's description of the Pythagorean formula, from De Architectura IX.6: namque si sumantur regulae tres e quibus una sit pedes III ...


5

As Aristotle is generally considered as the father of biology — Darwin wrote: “Linnaeus and Cuvier have been my two gods… but they were mere school-boys to old Aristotle.” (in a letter to W. Ogle, 1882) —, it is logical to search for such a definition in his works. According to Pierre Pellegrin (in particular in Une zoologie sans espèce, 1984), the ...


5

Is Kant's "De Mundi Sensibilis atque Intelligibilis Forma et Principiis" available online in its Latin original? Hard to answer with a sound "no", as I might end up being proved wrong. However, I could not find one version in Latin wherever I searched. I also looked at my university's library, which has access to paywalled repositories of classical texts (...


4

First, let's just note that the English phrase "machine learning" does not unambiguously communicate its meaning. If you had no context for it, you wouldn't know if it meant using a machine to learn, or learning about machines, or a machine doing the learning, etc. So, you've essentially asked for a translation that's more precise than the original phrase. ...


4

It is correct that ἤλεκτρον means “gold-silver alloy”, and then “amber”, and that it is the source of modern words like electricity, electric, electromagnetism etc. But I do not think you can say that “electron” is borrowed directly from ἤλεκτρον, especially as it does not have the same meaning. Rather it is a modern formation with the “particle” suffix -on. ...


4

Although it is a bit oblique, I'll put up in harena because it provides a natural way to work things out by hand, but involves the use of a tool, and so might easily extend to the use of computers more easily than would in mente. If I recall correctly, it is conjectured that geometers would have worked out diagrams in tamped sand.


3

Had you considered Adelard of Bath? His translation of Euclid (from Arabic) and his treatise on the Astrolabe (written for William II) are both significant. "Various questions" is a bit long-winded but pithy compared to Newton. His book on falconry is based on observation and best practice and was addressed to High-school students. You would not have to ...


3

For referring to a collaborator, have you thought of socius or adiutor? The latter does not necessarily imply a subordinate role and can quite well be used of equals in a partnership. Each has a wide range of application, but the sense is always of working together in the same enterprise. To describe a collaboration on matters scientific, it's probably ...


3

collaboro or conlaboro is also in L/S, with the same unique reference to the early Christian author Tertullian (who writes fairly decent classicising Latin). It is a correctly formed prefixed verb and I would think it mere chance that it is not attested in classical authors. http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0059%3Aentry%...


2

Given that this is the Vicipaedia article on computer models, I'd suggest: In simulatione It doesn't quite fit -- like you pointed out -- but it's the best word I can find. It means "model", seems to have a connotation of "computer" or "mathematical", and is short enough.


2

As we always say on here: context would be helpful. Libella in classical Latin is already "spirit-level", "water-level" (L&S have references to Lucretius and others). And yes, libella is the etymon of English "level" and of French "niveau". But the oldest reference for the English "sea-level" is not until 1803 (ref. OED). The French "niveau de la mer" is ...


2

If I understand correctly, you want to divide your data into equally large sets and calculate an average for each set. Equally large sets are often called equinumerous. Finite sets with the same number of elements are equinumerous, but the concept becomes more complicated for infinite sets. All the definitions using bijections or cardinals or any other tool ...


2

I would call it an isoplethic or homoplethic average measurement. It is a Greek compound formed of ἴσος ("same", "equal") and πλῆθος (which usually mean "big quantity", but could be used more specifically with the meaning of "quantity", "amount"). Furthermore, the term "isoposotic" that you suggested is not attested as a compund in ancient Greek, while ...


2

I'm not entirely sure if I understand your meaning, so please comment if this isn't what you're looking for. But it sounds like you want a word meaning the average of each group of data, divided by quantiles of the domain? I agree with Cerberus about using quant- as the root, meaning (roughly) "amount". -il- is still the best I've come across for dividing ...


2

To add another voice to this conversation, I would like to show the entries given for various particles in the Morgan and Silva Furman University Lexicon: electron- electron, -onis; electronium, -i proton- protonium -i neutron- neutro, -onis; neutronium, -i anti-neutron- antineutronium anti-proton- antiprotonium photon- photonium ...


1

Only now, somewhat accidentally while searching for another original source, did I find out that there is at least one online rendition of the Latin original of De Mundi Sensibilis atque Intelligibilis Forma et Principiis, and a professional and careful rendition at that: https://korpora.zim.uni-duisburg-essen.de/Kant/aa02/ For what's that worth, here is ...


1

There are reasons to treat them as (Greek style) second declension neuters. The Latin ending corresponding to the Greek -on is -um, and the names can be Latinized as electrum etc. There was no word for an electron in Greek or any other language. One simply had to come up with a new word or borrow a word from a classical language and change the meaning &...


1

My suggestion may or may not fit the spirit of your question, but the Creator ineffabilis (Student's Prayer of Thomas Aquinas) is beautifully written and includes a request that God collaborate with the three stages of a student's work: Ingressum instruas, progressum dirigas, egressum compleas. These are all classically attested words (obviously), ...


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