Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
6

Martial wrote a poem about Publius' dog called Issa. It begins: Issa est passere nequior Catulli, Issa est purior osculo columbae, Issa est blandior omnibus puellis, Issa est carior Indicis lapillis, Issa est deliciae catella Publi. Issa is naughtier than Catullus’ sparrow, Issa is purer than a dove’s kiss, Issa is more winning than ...


6

In Petronius, Satyricon 64, Trimalchio's favorite, Croesus, has an 'indecently fat black puppy' (catellam nigram atque indecenter pinguem) named Margarita, which means 'pearl', and Trimalchio himself has a dog, the 'bulwark of the house and household' (praesidium domus familiaeque) named Scylax, which is Greek for 'young dog' or 'puppy'. In the meantime, ...


6

I don’t think there is any attestation of a direct prohibition of the no smoking type for the classical period. The closest I could find is CIL VI, 2357, from Rome, but it is not a prohibition, it is a kind request: HOSPES AD HUNC TUMULUM NI MEIAS OSSA PRECANTUR TECTA HOMINIS SET SI GRATUS HOMO ES MISCE BIBE DA MI NI=ne, SET=sed, MI=mihi Passerby, the ...


5

"Questions" that are actually requests using the archaic "potin?" are numerous in Plautus, and they appear in Terence as well. I think based on the evidence that a Roman would readily understand this type of request-phrased-as-a-question but might find it somewhat rude or abrupt: the examples in the corpus always seem to carry a hint of exasperation. ...


5

Since there has not been a better answer as yet, I will put forth the example of Odysseus' famous dog, Ἄργος (which seems to be an epithet, rather than a human-type name).


3

The first thing I thought of was Horace, Epode 9.33: capaciores adfer huc, puer, scyphos Fetch roomier goblets here, boy Capaciores is the comparative degree of the adjective capax, which has, as one of its definitions, '(of containers, places, etc.) Able to hold a lot, capacious, roomy.' A scyphus (Greek σκύφος) was a large, two-handles drinking ...


3

If you wanted an ostentatious and overly-grandiose name, domus is a nice word for "house", and ingēns, -tis means something like "impossibly or excessively large". (It's also a more poetic word than magnus or longus.) For "cup", a straightforward word is calix, whence "chalice". But I would go with a Greek loan, dīnus (from δεῖνος~δῖνος). In Greek it was a ...


3

A famous Greek example: Plato supposedly put a sign over the door to his school reading ἀγεωμέτρητος μηδεὶς εἰσίτω, “May no one ignorant of geometry enter here” “Geometriae ignarus nullus ingrediatur”. The story is apparently apocryphal (see: https://www.persee.fr/doc/reg_0035-2039_1968_num_81_384_1013).


3

Höcker, Christoph (Kissing), “Cenaculum”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, says the following about cenaculum: "originally the dining room on the upper floor of the Roman house. From time to time the term cenaculum includes the entire upper floor (Varro, Ling. 5,162; Fest. 54,6); the rooms described as cenacula were for accommodating guests of an inferior rank or ...


3

Here's a partial answer: 1. prosit Prosit (lit. may it be useful) came to mind (as I commented), but I couldn't easily find it attested. The fact that it is used in languages other than German suggests a former widespread culture of using prosit in toasts that could perfectly come from a time when Latin was the cultured lingua franca. But it could as well ...


2

This is how it is read. But as for the “sacrificial” tradition, it is not a sacrifice but a votive offering in a tradition still practised in many parts of the Latin-speaking world. You promise God or a saint to make an offering to get you out of a sticky spot. The offering is of apposite form and nature. For health troubles it might be an eye or an ear ...


1

This is not an example of a "Roman view" on wolves and dogs, but a story that seems to have come from the Greek world that Romans became aware of at some point. The fable of "The Dog and the Wolf" is included in at least some collections of the fables of Aesop; Wikipedia says it is "well attested in later Greek sources, including the collection of Babrius, ...


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