18

In general, if you're going for authentic Roman numerals, you'd have to convert the decimal portion into one of the fractions that a Roman would use – or a sum of those fractions. Obviously, this is somewhat more straightforward for something like '1.5 hours' (for which there's also the single word sesquihora) than for '12.34' – though, for most people's ...


6

I don’t think there is any attestation of a direct prohibition of the no smoking type for the classical period. The closest I could find is CIL VI, 2357, from Rome, but it is not a prohibition, it is a kind request: HOSPES AD HUNC TUMULUM NI MEIAS OSSA PRECANTUR TECTA HOMINIS SET SI GRATUS HOMO ES MISCE BIBE DA MI NI=ne, SET=sed, MI=mihi Passerby, the ...


3

Höcker, Christoph (Kissing), “Cenaculum”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, says the following about cenaculum: "originally the dining room on the upper floor of the Roman house. From time to time the term cenaculum includes the entire upper floor (Varro, Ling. 5,162; Fest. 54,6); the rooms described as cenacula were for accommodating guests of an inferior rank or ...


3

Here's a partial answer: 1. prosit Prosit (lit. may it be useful) came to mind (as I commented), but I couldn't easily find it attested. The fact that it is used in languages other than German suggests a former widespread culture of using prosit in toasts that could perfectly come from a time when Latin was the cultured lingua franca. But it could as well ...


3

A famous Greek example: Plato supposedly put a sign over the door to his school reading ἀγεωμέτρητος μηδεὶς εἰσίτω, “May no one ignorant of geometry enter here” “Geometriae ignarus nullus ingrediatur”. The story is apparently apocryphal (see: https://www.persee.fr/doc/reg_0035-2039_1968_num_81_384_1013).


3

Considering the number of times that Roman senators made fun of people with provincial accents (Hadrian is a good example), you could probably argue that whatever was spoken in Rome was what was closest to being considered the "standard" or "correct" way to pronounce Latin. On the topic of pronunciation, you might find this post on how it is that we know how ...


1

Logeion, s.v. impudicus, gives Martial 6.70.5 which mind you isn't specified as being the middle finger. But there's an interesting and amusing commentary on that passage in an article (CJ 47:67) on Roman Elementary Mathematics by J. Hilton Turner, which makes it pretty clear that it was. Elsewhere in the same article, there's a translation of a chunk of ...


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