8

For actually speaking Latin (or Ancient Greek), I would recommend Latin & Ancient Greek Chat. The chats are hosted by a magister, and the group is very welcoming. Be advised, though, that unless you have already engaged in some Latin conversation, you may find it difficult the first times you take part, not due to the community there being negative in ...


7

The commentary that I have for the Menaechmi, by P. Thoresby Jones (Oxford U. Press), has this note for the line: Samiae: i.e. fragile like earthenware. Samian ware was the commonest crockery used at Rome; cf. Stich. 694; Cic. pro Mur. 36,75. Definition 3 for Samius in Oxford Latin dictionary states this: 3 (applied to a cheap, brittle type of pottery ...


7

You'll have to be careful with the phrase "expected to." On the one hand, it can give connotations of desire. "I expect you to do well in this position" can mean "I want you to do well" or even "I demand that you do well." You can see a boss telling his subordinate such a thing. On the other hand, it can also mean ...


6

The triumvir monetalis (not tresvir monetales, as the Dartmouth site writes – that is gibberish) responsible was L. Cassius Longinus. His name and job title is on the reverse in big fat letters. I believe the single letter on the obverse is a “control letter” or die mark. It is my understanding that the purpose of these marks – sometimes letters, at other ...


6

In addition to the Zoom chat (which may not be everyone's cup of tea), there are quite a few active communities that are more permanent. Discord is notable for allowing real-time voice communication, and is the best messaging app in general, so I recommend it as the place to start. Discord: The LLPSI Discord server - help, exchange and resources for ...


4

I believe that there may be no special word for those terms. Here are some things I found: In the Nova Vulgata, Leviticus 20:20 reads: Qui coierit cum uxore patrui vel avunculi sui... "Whoever has intercourse with their own (paternal or maternal) uncle's wife..." Here we have patrui vel avunculi referring to both maternal and paternal uncles. It'...


2

In Cicero's De Re Publica, Book I, there's a conversation between Scipio and Laelius which deals with this sort of conflict: S. Ergo non probares, si consilio pulso libidines, quae sunt innumerabiles, iracundiaeve tenerent omnia? (Scipio. Then you would not approve that the evil passions, which are innumerable, should expel conscience, and that lusts and ...


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