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I'm not aware of a book about this specifically, but almost all of our grammar terminology, at least when it comes to Greek and Latin specifically, is due to a (short!) work ascribed to Dionysius Thrax, Τέχνη Γραμματική ('The Art of Grammar'), filtered through the sometimes questionable translation skills of Roman grammarians, and from there lifted almost ...


3

Public domain texts here means “out of copyright and free to use”. While ancients texts are themselves public domain, a modern transcription may not be, as it may amalgamate different sources, make textual choices, correct errors and otherwise apply a degree of editorialisation to the Latin. Thus to be safely public domain, a Latin text must be a literal ...


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Fortunately, almost all Classical Latin texts are in the public domain, since almost all Classical Latin authors have been dead for about two thousand years. Translations and commentaries are a different matter, but to the best of my knowledge, the exact words of Cicero and Vergil as transcribed from a manuscript are not under copyright anywhere in the world....


3

If you're interested in student texts, like the Cambridge Greek & Latin Classics commentaries you mentioned, there are also the Bristol Classical Press text and commentaries, which were bought out by Bloomsbury a few years back. Like the Cambridge series, these are primarily aimed at students. I don't know how well they fare since they were acquired. ...


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Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics? I can't in fact find out whether these are translations, bilingual editions or monolingual editions! Anyone know?


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Bibliotheca Teubneriana Another excellent set of critical editions is the Teubner series. Unlike the OCT, these have a more orange or brown color to the set. The scholarship is tilted German, whereas the OCTs are tilted English, but both are excellent, and choosing one of the other comes down to a case by case basis.


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Oxford Classical Texts Yes, the front matter and introduction are (often, but that is changing) in Latin, as well as the apparatus criticus, but the text itself is in whatever language the work was written in. I have Latin, Greek, and even Middle English OCTs, and they do look nice on the shelf. Sometimes they come in bigger sizes: so commentaries (like West'...


3

Dickinson has an excellent resource for beginners: https://dcc.dickinson.edu/ovid-amores/scansion They've been hard at work at getting a lot of resources for students on their website, like Allen and Greenough. One resource I've long used is Rudy Negenborn's Catullus site, where, besides including different translations, he has all of Catullus scanned, too. ...


2

In among these excellent suggestions, may I offer a strong disrecommendation, if there is such a word. That is the Teach Yourself Get Started in Latin by G D A Sharpley. Whilst purporting to teach Classical Latin, it is, bizarrely, set in a mediaeval monastery, and thus introduces words such as monasterium, monachus etc, words of little use for reading ...


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