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13

I've found I quite enjoy reading Ovid—his work is poetry, not prose, which adds a bit of difficulty, but the mythological subjects are pretty familiar, which makes it easier to deal with unknown words from context. And his style feels more transparent to me than e.g. Vergil's. I usually translate with The Latin Library open in one window and Perseus's word ...


11

I would suggest the PHI corpus search. To try out your example, I searched for numquam, facile, and mori close to each other, and the whole phrase by Seneca turns up — among a couple of false positives. The syntax is quite flexible, allowing you to force word boundaries (so that searching for mori doesn't return memoria), decide whether words are ...


10

One slightly offbeat option would be Asterix. It's not quite classic literature, but it's well written and fun.


9

One option, perhaps best alongside other approaches, is to read (and listen to) the Latin news broadcast Nuntii Latini. News come in every week and concern matters you have likely encountered in other media. The texts are fairly short and aimed at a broad readership. Unfortunately the vocabulary is not all that well documented. The authors of Nuntii Latini ...


8

I have used Duolingo for other languages, and I've now briefly tested it for Latin. There are two major issues: It goes way too fast. If the course has to be short for practical reasons, I would much rather have it stop early than go fast. The system is too inflexible at accepting translations in both directions. I am not sure if you can even reasonably ...


8

Try "Completely Parsed Cicero" by Maclardy. It´s on Amazon.


7

A good place to start is at http://ephemeris.alcuinus.net/ This is a sort of newspaper with all kinds of contributions, from jokes and cartoons to serious current news items and fiction. It is edited by a Polish academic and is published from Warsaw. The Latin isn't always perfect, because contributions are accepted from anyone with a basically sound ...


7

There is a project called The Ancient Greek and Latin Dependency Treebank, which has done dependency trees for some Greek and Latin texts. There is a document explaining the project here. It seems it does not contain English translations, but if you combine their work with a dictionary, or an English translation of the text, you might get further. There are ...


5

Dictionary Headword Search What I usually use to find an L&S entry using Tuft's Perseus Digital Library is the "Dictionary Headword Search" (URLs for this kind of search contain "resolveform?" followed by search-specific information; you can perform a search of this type by going to the "General Search Tools" page and opening the third box down, labeled ...


5

If you're so inclined, I'd suggest the Latin Bible. The syntax tends to be fairly straight-forward, and it's easy to consult English translations for comparison.


4

As Rafael rightly pointed out, providing download links to copyrighted material is illegal, and thus beyond the scope of this site. However, the book you are asking for (Cambridge Latin Course) is, for the moment, freely accessible online (and online-only, i.e. no downloads) here. Notice the disclaimer though: We have put our Cambridge Latin Course ...


4

This may not be for everyone, but I personally read one articulus of the Summa Theologica by Thomas Aquinas every day. It can be found online at corpusthomisticum.org, and there is an English translation at CCEL. Each articulus is nicely bite-sized, just the right thing over a cup of coffee. The structure is extremely regular and repetitive, which helps in ...


4

My Latin-Dutch dictionary (Muller-Renkema, 1970) lists the debauchery, without the macron, as first lemma, saying it’s related to lŭtum, mud. The sacrifice, with the macron, is related to lūstro, which in itself has two meanings. illuminate, derived from a reconstructed form leuk-s-trom purify, derived from a reconstructed form lŏu(e)s-trom cf. ἐ-λοϜεσ-σα ...


4

Besides the issues found by Joonas, I'd add a few features not necessarily bad, but worth knowing in advance, for those willing to try the course: Pronunciation is consistently reconstructed. The examples are somewhat US-centered. Like Novum Eboracum est urbs Americana. Judging from other examples by the same collaborators, this apparently means America = ...


3

I'd suggest a bit of background reading before you take the plunge. 'A Natural History of Latin' by Tore Jansen would be a good place to start: it is an excellent survey of Latin and its history, demonstrating very gently how to approach it while introducing the accidence and syntax in a general, but very positive, way. If nothing else gives you an appetite ...


3

It looks as if you are hoping for a latter-day Quintilian, but the modern works from which he might draw examples hardly form a body which could be thought of as homogeneous to anything near the degree seen in the literature to which Quintilian had access. [That said, the website http://ephemeris.alcuinus.net/ is an engaging source of modern Latin, with many ...


3

There is Index Thomisticus, a treebank consisting of work of Thomas Aquinas. It is a free resource under a Creative Commons licence.


3

ā, ă, ē, ĕ, ī, ū are all easily typable on an Android device by long-pressing the corresponding vowel. So ĭ, ŏ, ō, ŭ, ȳ and y̆ are missing. For Samsung, I'll quote a post from here, but only in part because that procedure doesn't seem to work for me: In your browser, find and copy the letter you need from any site. Go to Settings > Language and input > ...


2

A brute force solution, based on the entry list of +12k Latin nouns available in Wiktionary: Go to this website. In the "Categories" tab, change "Project" to "wiktionary" and "Categories" to Latin nouns, as shown below. In the "Output" tab, select CSV (to eliminate restriction on number of elements to return). Click "Do it!" button. You should now get a ...


2

TL;DR Payments were not only carried out through physical money transfer. In fact, it seems there used to be a pretty developed financial intermediation system (with varying space-time heterogeneity). Moreover, coinage was fairly widespread, diminishing the need for money transfers between places. And, when money had to be transferred, there might have been ...


2

Another computer tool is Collatinus. It has GUI, gives definition of the words, IPA pronunciation (classic), syllables, and marks stress.


2

Here's a new opportunity with regard to Ecclesiastical Latin. On June 8, 2019, Vatican Radio started broadcasting Hebdomada Papae, notitiae vaticanae latine redditae (The Pope's week in review: Vatican news bulletin in Latin), a 5-minute weekly news bulletin airing every Saturday. The programme is curated by Alessandro De Carolis, head of Vatican Radio, ...


2

Serious students should have at their disposal at least one Latin-Latin dictionary. The Forcellini Lexicon is an early modern edition that is still very useful.


2

jclsource.org/dictionary is a good free Latin to English and English to Latin dictionary. It uses Whitaker's words as a database. The rest of the site has lots of good resources, and as a developer of JCLSource, I strongly recommend the site not only for the dictionary. We are still working on improving the dictionary UI and adding auto-fill, but this is ...


2

The best resource list I know of is this one from Justin Slocum Bailey of Indwelling Language. Check especially the section titled "Fairly simple Latin reading material." Here I've selectively reproduced part of the list and added a few of my own recommendations. These resources are modern Latin readers designed to help students practice reading. They are ...


2

Latin as a living language is found in the documents of the Catholic Church. For example, the Institutio general is de Liturgia Horarum is almost 100 pages long and is a mixture of exposition and detailed prescription. All major Church documents, including all papal encyclicals, exhortations etc are also published in Latin first and translated from there. ...


2

I use the Swype keyboard, which has macra available for all vowels except y, by long-pressing the letter. So you could use that.


2

Preliminary note: Here is a personal selection of two textbooks for someone with an undergraduate degree in Linguistics (i.e., not necessarily, as I understand from your question, in Classics. In case the student is more familiarized with Latin, please let me know since I can also recommend you other more advanced grammars). Panhuis, Dirk (2006). Latin ...


2

I have used "Cornélie, ou le latin sans pleurs", by Salomon Reinach (1912), and liked it. This may be older than you were looking for. But if I remember Wheelock rightly, I think Reinach has a similar jaunty, chatty tone and an emphasis on reading short, typically edifying, passages. It's available online through the Bibliothèque nationale de France. He ...


1

I can't say whether it's trustworthy or not, and it is quite old, but one French book that aims to introduce its reader to Latin is Nouvelle Méthode Pour Apprendre Facilement La Langue Latine: Contenant Les Regles Des Genres, Des Déclinaisons, Des Préterits, de la Syntaxe, de la Quantité, & des Accens Latins, mises en françois avec un ordre très-clair &...


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