9 votes
Accepted

Unsure why the accusative relative pronoun is used? [Tacitus Annals 2.24]

I think corpora equorum must be the subject of the clause, with quos its object, and the verb tolerare being used with the following sense per Lewis and Short: Transf., to support a person or thing, ...
  • 22.3k
8 votes
Accepted

Antecedent Noun After The Relative Clause

That the antecedent noun follows the relative clause happens occasionally. In this case the demonstrative adjective and the noun are separated, which is an example of hyperbaton, and hyperbata are ...
7 votes
Accepted

Using subjunctive in relative clause linked to indirect command

The basic sentence structure can broken down into three component parts: imperavi militi, "I ordered" - main clause, indicative ut flores conligeret, "the soldier to collect flowers&...
  • 41.7k
7 votes
Accepted

What mood should the verb of a relative clause within a purpose clause be?

Indicative seems to be correct for both languages. It's true that Latin has a so-called "subjunctive by attraction", whereby a verb in a subordinate clause that depends on a subjunctive will itself be ...
  • 28.7k
7 votes

What is the difference between "ubi" and "in quo" as relative adverbs?

Well, it is a simple answer to the question itself...ubi is not a relative pronoun, even if it is sometimes used as one. Ergo, it is always safe to simply use in quo, as, when translated idiomatically ...
  • 346
7 votes
Accepted

Accusative in genitive relative clause with verb finiebat

There aren't any special uses involved here; your incorrect assumption is that embolum (navis) aeneum is accusative -- in fact it's the nominative subject of finiebat. Literally, "one part of which a ...
  • 28.7k
7 votes

Unsure why the accusative relative pronoun is used? [Tacitus Annals 2.24]

It's accusative as the object of tolerāverant. Corpora is nominative: "except for those whom the washed-ashore-there bodies of horses sustained". This isn't the most common meaning of ...
  • 53.7k
6 votes

Antecedent Noun After The Relative Clause

This is just a follow-up answer to the excellent one provided by Sebastian Koppehel. He is probably right when saying "I would not expect ordinary grammar books to give examples of every possible ...
  • 6,634
6 votes
Accepted

Concerning the use of relative pronouns

The relative pronoun can also be used to start a new independent clause, and in this use it doesn't really function as a relative pronoun in the usual sense. This is sometimes known as a connecting or ...
6 votes
Accepted

What is the grammar of ‘quid illud quod’ in Ambrose De. ob. Val. 35?

I would say that illud might be translated as that, referring to the subordinate clause introduced by quod, which might also be translated as that: Quid illud quod mori non timuit? What [is] that ...
5 votes
Accepted

Are there generalizations about when relative clauses are used instead of participles?

To an extent, it is a matter of personal preference or style. Cicero used participles sparingly and preferred whole sentences, Caesar used them more frequently for his trademark compact style and ...
4 votes
Accepted

Does using quippe in a relative clause require conjunctive?

It seems that either mode was used, but each author seems to have chosen either one or the other, or both. Based on a cursory glance at the first couple of pages with quippe qui from the HP corpus, ...
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4 votes

Word order with relative clauses

Equidem propono haec: Est pellicula cinematographica de puella cata, quae familiam amantem habere vult. Ecce Matilda, pellicula de puella acri ingenio, quae familiam amantem desiderat. Vocem est ...
4 votes

Natural translation of "... Herculaneum, a town near the mountain"

I have never seen Latin allow a construction like "a town near the mountain". It would be more idiomatic to say "a town which is near the mountain", but this might feel too heavy. However, it is ...
3 votes
Accepted

Mr Bean's Latin lyrics

I think you are correct that "Vale homo qui es faba" would be grammatical. A noun following "Vale" is frequently in the vocative form, sometimes in the nominative form, based on ...
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3 votes

Word order with relative clauses

Yeah, I'd go for either nomine Matilda ("Matilda by name") or cui titulus/nomen est Matilda ("to which the title is Matilda"). The only possible flaw I see in your word order is that usually (not ...
3 votes
Accepted

Word order with relative clauses

Your word order looks fine—but then Latin is not very particular about word order altogether. You could swap around a few words and it would still be fine. Est at the beginning is perfectly fine. ...
  • 19k
3 votes

Indirect question vs. relative clause

I have always been taught that indirect questions are written as such: Rettulit mihi quid accidisset. Indirect questions are formed where the main part of the sentence, in this case to relate, is in ...
  • 3,868
3 votes

Why add "ei" to a sentence with "imperare" and "parere"?

The relative pronoun qui is masculine plural, and you translate it as "those who". As you can see, in English, we have a demonstrative/personal pronoun "those" and a relative pronoun "who". In Latin (...
  • 19k
2 votes

Are there generalizations about when relative clauses are used instead of participles?

Either approach does work; however, the tense of petet is future, which is quite unlikely as an equivalent of petentem. You probably meant petit, which is present tense. The tense of "petentem&...
  • 2,590
1 vote

Antecedent Noun After The Relative Clause

Sebastian Koppehel's answer is correct. I would like to add that Reginaldus Foster, the rather eccentric, but by all accounts effective, educator devotes the better part of a chapter of his first year ...
  • 2,879
1 vote

Relative sentence in the past

The concept of embarrassment seems to be a tricky one, in Latin. The verbs offered "perturbo"; "impedio"; "confundo"; involve being disturbed; discomforted; perplexed; confused; disconcerted; knocked ...
  • 7,380
1 vote

Quippe+quod (Early Modern period)

As Figulus has noted, the neuter singular accusative/nominative form of the relative pronoun quod can definitely be used after quippe; any form of the relative pronoun can, really. However, that isn'...
  • 18k

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