9 votes
Accepted

Unnecessary genitive being used with 'suum'

You are confusing gĕnu, -ūs ("knee") and gĕnus, -ĕris ("origin, lineage, stock"). The latter is a 3rd declension neuter noun, so the accusative singular is the same as the nominative singular. Hence,...
brianpck's user avatar
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9 votes
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How would I emphasize a definite noun? (Greek)

It depends on the position of αὐτός. When it's in attributive position, it means 'same': ὁ αὐτὸς δοῦλος (also, more rarely, δοῦλος ὁ αὐτός or ὁ δοῦλος ὁ αὐτός), 'the same slave.' Example: Antiphon 5....
cnread's user avatar
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7 votes
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What does the -met ending mean in "vosmet" or "temet"

It's for emphasis, and older than the use of ipse as an intensifier. From Allen & Greenough §143.d: Emphatic forms of tu are tute and tutemet (tutimet). The other cases of the personal pronouns,...
cmw's user avatar
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7 votes
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Why is a reflexive pronoun the subject of this genitive absolute? (Greek)

ἑαυτοῦ: this is reflexive because it's referring all the way back to the subject of the verb of speech that introduced this whole passage of indirect discourse. It's an "indirect reflexive": see the ...
TKR's user avatar
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6 votes
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How one can say "The door opened" in Latin?

I believe I've found one example from Ovid(correct me if I'm wrong) where se movet and movetur are attested in the perfect to mean "changed/moved" “sunt, o fortissime, quorum forma semel ...
d_e's user avatar
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5 votes
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Why is "se" used with "secum" in this quote from Livy?

Lewis and Short include this on infero: Se, to betake one's self to, repair to, go into, enter, esp. with the accessory notion of haste and rapidity. That is, se inferre means more or less "to ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes

Position of reflexive pronouns

In Latin Word Order: Structured Meaning and Information, p 286, Devine and Stephens say: In styles like that of Livy, which allow V-bar syntax, a weak pronoun can remain in the base verb phrase as a ...
Vegawatcher's user avatar
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4 votes
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Antecedent of a Greek pronoun in the Critias

Are there cases where the reflexive pronoun is not used, even though it is referring to the subject of the sentence? Yes. Smyth, at § 1228.a, notes: “instead of the indirect ἑαυτοῦ etc., there may ...
Penelope's user avatar
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4 votes

Antecedent of a Greek pronoun in the Critias

In the 1929 Loeb edition of Critias (trans. R. G. Bury, p. 266), there is a rough breathing on the second pronoun of your question: which indicates that it is a contracted reflexive pronoun and, ...
Penelope's user avatar
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4 votes

How one can say "The door opened" in Latin?

Perhaps Ov. Am. 3.8.7 would count as an example: Cum bene laudavit, laudato ianua clausa est. Even though she praises my text, the door has/is closed for the praised one. (my quick translation) ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
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Servus dominum orabat ne se verbera–

It should be the active form. The subject of the subordinate clause is the master and the object (se) is the slave. Some verbs can have a deponent variant, and for a deponent verb you should use a ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes
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Summa Theologiae - se extendit

The verb extendere is transitive, meaning it expects a direct object. The verb means to prolong, spread out, or extend something. So, the se here makes the verb reflexive. The scientia Dei isn't ...
Kingshorsey's user avatar
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3 votes

Translate "Quiet your mind"

Tacere means "to be quiet", not "to make quiet". Unless you want to do something like "make it so that your mind is quiet", tacere is not an option. One possibility in this direction is cura ut mens ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
1 vote

How one can say "The door opened" in Latin?

The perfect tense can be used in the active voice or the passive voice. It can also be used in ablative absolute constructions. We can express the idea "the door opened" in the following ...
ktm5124's user avatar
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1 vote

"Middle constructions" in Latin?

I will make the argument that maturo is such a verb. (which, in some respects, matches the English ripen/grow in this (which is not shared by other languages)). First, its primary meaning is the ...
d_e's user avatar
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