18

di- is Greek and bi- is Latin The Proto-Indo-European root for "two" is reconstructed as *dw-. The remnants of this w can be seen in English "two", Russian dva, Ancient Greek δύο, and many other languages, as well as Latin duo, "two". Old Latin had many words starting with dv- (where v was pronounced as English "w"). ...


16

This might not be the best question to ask for this format chiefly because there are so many color words in Latin, and their meanings are not always as simple and exact as English would have you believe. For one, "basic colors" is a modern categorization, though it does have its roots in ancient Aristotelian thought. See this paper if you have access to it. ...


15

tomus primus = "volume one".


12

Your are confused; bi- is Latin and di- is Greek. There is no real difference in meaning between them, but in usage bi- is used with Latin constructions like bisexual and di- with Greek constructions like diglossia. bi- is not a Greek prefix. (As an aside, I should mention that both Latin bi- and Greek δι‐ have a common origin in a reconstructed ancestor *...


11

The particular words you were looking for are ἢ στέφος ἢ θάνατον ("either the crown or death," in the accusative case; θάνατος would be the nominative case if detached from its original context). As for the provenance, the source seems to be the epitaph of a boxer named Agathos Daimon or Kamelos. The Ancient Olympics site gives the Greek text of ...


10

De Vaan (2008) says that the etymology is uncertain and that both of the theories you mentioned have problems. He bases this on the two most commonly consulted etymological dictionaries of Latin, Walde–Hoffmann and Ernout–Meillet: Proto-Italic *kapelo- 'who takes'. Walde–Hoffmann derive discipulus from *dis-capiō 'to assume mentally, interpret' (cf. ...


10

It is from Albius Tibullus (died 19 BC), Book II, 1. It would be a little surprising to find the superi in the Vulgate. It means “the heavenly gods” (as opposed to the gods of the underworld). John Paul II read these lines on a daily basis because they were inscribed above the entrance of the school he attended as a youth, the Gymnasium of Wadowice. This ...


8

I haven't completely figured out the book's layout, but it appears that it contains both volumes IX and X. In any case, the numbering starts over at index #160 (pg. 4), and the entry you're looking for is at index #230 (pg. 74): Portavi lacrimis madidus te nostra catella, quod feci lustris laetior ante tribus. Ergo mihi, Patrice, iam non dabis oscula ...


8

Since a rainbow is a gradient, there's still no way of knowing which hue a color word refers to. At best we can approximate. Earl Anderson's Folk-Taxonomies in Early English has a good discussion if it (citing Dronke 1974), along with this neat chart: However, there are quite a few butcherings of the Greek, so I recommend you jump straight to Edmund ...


7

I can't find the exact phrase but perhaps the following capture the spirit of it. nemo risum praebuit qui ex se cepit no one becomes a laughing-stock who laughs at himself Seneca, De Constantia, 17.3 - this is the translation of J. W. Basore (1928); my own (clunky) translation is: no one provided [themselves] as an object of laughter who seized it ...


7

The UK National Archive runs a two part course which gives immediate feedback and quickly introduces .1. dating of mss .2. different styles of writing (book script, private notes, .3. post classical grammar .4. some abbreviations. You'll whizz through that. For simply the Abbreviations also known as Sigla For manuscripts earlier than 850, including a ...


7

A fantastic read if you're aimed down that rabbit hole would be Guy Deutscher, Through the Language Glass: Why the World Looks Different in Other Languages, New York 2010. He quotes "Lyons, J. 1999. Vocabulary of color with particular reference to ancient Greek and classical Latin. In The language of color in the Mediterranean, ed. A. Borg, 38–75. Stockholm: ...


6

Found one reference! Petronius, Satyricon, 73 Deinde ut lassatus consedit, invitatus balnei sono diduxit usque ad cameramos ebrium et coepit Menecratis cantica lacerare, sicut illi dicebant, qui linguam eius intellegebant. He then became tired and sat down, and the echoes of the bathroom encouraged him to open his tipsy jaws to the ceiling and begin to ...


6

Here's an example I remember, Verg., Ecl., 8, 96 Has herbas atque haec Ponto mihi lecta venena ipse dedit Moeris; nascuntur plurima Ponto. His ego saepe lupum fieri et se condere silvis Moerim [...] Lit. Moeris himself gave me these herbs and choice Pontian potions (they are abundantly growing in Pontus). I saw myself not once how Moeris turned ...


6

My guess would be their religious works, particularly pertaining to divination. In his De Divinatione 33.72, Cicero mentions these books: Quorum alia sunt posata in monumentis et disciplina, quod Etruscorum declarant, et haruspicini et fulgurales et rituales libri, vestri etiam augurales… (Trans. mine) Others of these [divination methods] are ...


5

The two lines are an elegiac couplet. This poetic form was common in classical Latin, but not used in the Bible at all. As very little Christian literature has been written in this metre, it is likely that the reference is to Roman poetry. And as Sebastian's answer indicates, this is exactly the case. The point of this answer was just to point out that this ...


5

I think English-Latin dictionaries are your best choice here. For instance, this dictionary has 6 pages of "Christian names" (and some surnames) in Latin. Other examples are pages 311-2 of this dictionary, and page 927 of this one. There is also a Wikipedia list (although it is sorted in Latin). Unfortunately this list has no references, so I would double ...


5

This isn't a definitive "these are the must haves for learning Latin" list, but these are the texts that I have used in the past for my learning. I was first introduced to Latin through Cambridge Latin Course. These books attempt to give the reader a rather holistic look at the language. Each chapter starts with a series of sentences in Latin accompanied by ...


5

There is one book that you would find more useful than any other, and that is a Latin Bible. The internet provides access to Manuscripts from the British Library, and the Beinecke (Yale), and the Parker Library (Cambridge) and several others. So, visit the British library, and tell them you want to read St Cuthbert's copy of St John, Add MS 89000 in half ...


5

For mapping Mycenaean Greek words to their meanings, the Linear B Lexicon has a searchable list of terms. Here's the entry for a-ja-me-no: a-ja-me-no Chadwick & Ventris 1973: inlaid masculine nominative singular Aura Jorro 1985: a) aplicado a cajas de carros (KN Sf) b) un nombre de materia cf. e-re-pa-te pa-ra-ku-we ku-ru-so etc. c) la parte del ...


4

I don't recall seeing that saying anywhere, but here is a translation suggestion: Insuperabilis est qui se ridere potest. One might expect ridere sibi instead of ridere se, but ridere appears to work with the accusative rather than the dative. Other possible translations of "invincible" would be invictus and invincibilis, but I like insuperabilis better. ...


4

Allen & Greenough §343 also lists it as a type of possessive genitive, giving a few examples. Note that this use of the genitive in the predicate is used with infinitives and with clauses: c. An infinitive or a clause, when used as a noun, is often limited by a genitive in the predicate:— neque suī iūdicī [erat] discernere (B. C. 1.35), ...


4

WITHHELD UNTIL COPYRIGHT STATUS VERIFIED


3

There is a whole book in Latin on the topic: https://books.google.it/books?id=PGhXAAAAcAAJ&printsec=frontcover&hl=it#v=onepage&q&f=false The title is De diis Romanorum patriis sive de Larum atque Penatium tam publicorum quam privatorum, and the author is Wilhelm Hertzberg, a German philologist and translator. Although I never read this ...


3

Puglia 2007 As announced in his comment, AlexB got ahold of Puglia 2007, sent it to the mods, and our tricipitous mod forwarded it to me. I read it, and I can now answer that part of this question. So, with a lot of pretty solid arguments, the article proposes the following collage of P.Oxy. 1787 fragments (where 87(13) and 87(14) have swapped numbers): ...


3

The answer to your questions might be in this 2012 article, published in the Journal "Listy filologické/Folia philologica". Notice it is in Czech (which I don't understand). But the English abstract reads (emphasis mine): The main aim of this article is to identify the origin and meaning of one Latin zoological term in the works of Thomas of Cantimpré and ...


3

In Berger 2012 doctoral dissertation we can find the following:


2

This has given me a sharp admonition about the care needed in transforming idiom when translating. I'm always at pains to emphasise this when helping anyone with a rendition into Latin, and have many times discussed the degree of liberty that is allowable : for instance, is it legitimate to use ad aram ducere instead of the more authentic in matrimonium? (it ...


2

First of all, you must have an institutional subscription to the Latin content on Oxford Scholarly Editions Online. You don’t need to download anything. “Select any word in a Latin text and a pop-up menu will appear.”


2

This seems to be a "basic principle of scholastic thought", referred as "possibility as potency". Regarding being related to scholastic thought, that is implied in texts like this one and this one. This 1787 book on theology and philosophy, published just two years after Kant's Grundlegung zur Metaphysik der Sitten, states (emphasis in original): V. Quod ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible