11

Since you’re asking about reduplicated perfect (and not reduplicated present, as in bibo < *pi-ph3-e or sero < si-sh1-e, Weiss 2009: 405), I will try to address perfect formation only. One of the problems is that synchronically we may not see all cases of reduplicated perfect in Classical Latin. However, by drawing on data from Old Latin and other ...


5

As indicated in previous answers, reduplication comes from Proto-Indoeuropean, mainly for stative aspect and imperfective aspect verb forms. This reduplication is seen in many PIE-derived languages, as cited in the above article: Ancient Greek: λύω lúō 'I free' vs. λέλυκα léluka "I have freed" Gothic: hald "I hold" vs. haíhald (hĕhald) "I/he held" ...


1

It is clear that the reduplicating verbs are deeply rooted in Proto-Indoeuropean, not only Latin and Greek exhibit them, but there are also traces of them in the Germanic languages (One class of strong verbs represented by German fallen, fällt, fiel, gefallen traces back to reduplicating verbs). Note that there was only a certain class that used ...


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