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4

As far as I can tell, there are no classical precedents for the specific form of the ending -oideus. It ultimately comes from Ancient Greek -οειδής, an ending found mostly on third-declension adjectives with the meaning "-shaped" or "-like". These adjectives are compounds containing the linking vowel -ο- followed by the element εἶδος &...


0

For this self-answer, I'm surveying nine online audio recordings of Homer. Eight are of the same material (the opening lines of Iliad 1), while Zinsstag is a different book of the Iliad. While I was at it, I checked what people were doing with ε and η as well. Some of these people are doing an Erasmian pronunciation, others a restored one. All of them seem ...


3

Greek transcriptions with β support a date as early as 200BC While the earliest evidence for the change of of Latin [w] to [β] or [v] in texts written in the Latin alphabet may date to the first century AD (as discussed in Nathaniel's answer), evidence from the transcription of Latin V with the Greek letter β seems to show up considerably earlier. Buszard (...


6

For context, none of the pronunciation systems used today for Latin developed by continuous change from the pronunciation of Latin as it was originally spoken by the Romans. The natural sound changes that occurred for Latin speakers resulted instead in the Romance languages. Present-day pronunciations of Latin are all based on spelling pronunciation, or more ...


6

Both of them are the same thing, and are pronounced the same way. It is just a matter of how to write it down. The left one, /ˈi.oː/, is phonemic transcription, showing the phonemes of the sound system of the language. The right one, [ˈioː], is phonetic transcription, showing the actual pronunciation. This means that phonetic transcription is more detailed. ...


1

I don't have an answer to your question, but I decided to go to look for the pronunciations in one of my Ancient Greek grammars, An Introduction to Ancient Greek: A Literary Approach by C.A.E Lusching, written about 1975. It recommends differing vowel qualities for long and short α and ι, apparently treating them somewhat like the pronunciation of Latin ...


2

There's immense variation in modern pronunciations of Greek for a variety of reasons, not least that many classicists don't know or care much about phonetic accuracy and basically just use whatever system they happen to have been taught. So, though I don't know the answer to your question about frequency, it may not matter that much for your purposes -- ...


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