Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

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3

I'd say the main source of our knowledge is poetry. This was true for the Greek grammarians, who invented the notion itself of vowel length, and created prosody as a scientific linguistic theory, aimed to learn how to read and compose correctly poetry (and, later on, rhetoric too). So they classified the phenomena and inferred abstract rules, together with ...


5

The complete answer has already be given by Joonas Ilmavirta; here are a few words on the prosody, which however only makes sense if you say the complete verse. As we know, these are the last words of Laocoön's speech (and, sadly, of his whole life), trying to persuade his fellows Trojans to not receive the horse from the Greeks. The whole verse (Æneid, II, ...


9

The word is tĭmĕō, so the vowels are short, short, and long. The stress is indeed on the first syllable according to the standard stress rules in Latin. Thus the e is neither long nor stressed, so I agree that any kind of emphasis on it would be awkward. The stress on the first syllable is the standard stress in prose, but in metric poetry ...


2

Here's a new opportunity with regard to Ecclesiastical Latin. On June 8, 2019, Vatican Radio started broadcasting Hebdomada Papae, notitiae vaticanae latine redditae (The Pope's week in review: Vatican news bulletin in Latin), a 5-minute weekly news bulletin airing every Saturday. The programme is curated by Alessandro De Carolis, head of Vatican Radio, ...


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