11 votes
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Why "quod" and not "quo" is used here?

A relative pronoun agrees with its antecedent in gender and number. Its case is determined by its role in the relative clause. In this case, quod agrees with ferrum in gender (neuter) and number (...
brianpck's user avatar
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8 votes
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Why "suam" and not "eius" is used in this sentence?

The idea that suus is used when the possessor is the subject is a simplification for beginners. It can be used in a variety of other contexts, generally with a sense along the lines of "her/his ...
Asteroides's user avatar
6 votes
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Why "ipse hic" is used here and not "ipse tu"?

The pronoun ipse refers to the implicit pronoun tu. While ipse can be used with personal or other pronouns like you list, it is also often used on its own even when referring to actors that are ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes
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What is the role of "ipso" in this quote from Cicero?

A couple of miscellaneous points, some iterated from my comments: You used more words to ask your question than strictly logically necessary. Why did you do that? Cicero doesn't use the bare minimum ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
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Usage of pronouns in chapter VIII of Lingua latina per se illustrata

"Is servus" is not an error. Latin "pronouns"* don't work like English pronouns. Is can be used by itself, but it can also be used adjectivally with a noun. The same goes for ille, ...
Asteroides's user avatar
4 votes

Position of reflexive pronouns

In Latin Word Order: Structured Meaning and Information, p 286, Devine and Stephens say: In styles like that of Livy, which allow V-bar syntax, a weak pronoun can remain in the base verb phrase as a ...
Vegawatcher's user avatar
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4 votes
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Why is "ad eum" and not a dative pronoun used in this sentence?

I agree with cmw that it is useful to compare the predicative frame of scribere with that of mittere. Let's start with the "easier" case, i.e. the one of the verb mittere. In his Oxford ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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4 votes

Why is "ad eum" and not a dative pronoun used in this sentence?

This information is easily found in Lewis and Short, a comprehensive dictionary of Latin. Under scribo (see the parts in bold): So freq. of written communications, letters; usually with ad aliquem (...
cmw's user avatar
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4 votes

Gender of antecedent of "hoc" in phrase "hoc quod"?

Grammatically, there is no antecedent, hence no agreement is necessary (or possible) The demonstrative hoc doesn't always have an antecedent. There is none here, any more than there is an antecedent ...
Asteroides's user avatar
3 votes

Libera te tutemet ex inferis vs. Libera temet [ipsum] ab inferis?

Yes, the most grammatically correct version of the phrase would probably be "Libera temet ab inferis." There are two reasons I suggest this: As already explained, the preposition ab makes ...
Anonymous's user avatar
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2 votes

Does ὅδε (hode) refer to what follows or what precedes?

Note the word "often" in Keller's grammar. What ὅδε will refer to depends on the context. The -δε enclitic is deictic, i.e. it points something out. For example, when Agamemnon insults ...
cmw's user avatar
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2 votes

Why is dative used in this sentence?

I believe it's supposed to be Dative of Advantage. So the alternate mother is of advantage ei to the baby.
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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2 votes

Why is dative used in this sentence?

I was just reading this chapter a couple of weeks ago. I thought the dative here when I read it worked like it does in English … “ in the place of a mother to the baby”- in English we would use “to…”, ...
user13557's user avatar
2 votes

Why "suam" and not "eius" is used in this sentence?

Although suus (the reflexive pronoun) usually refers to the subject of the sentence, it can refer to other nouns in the same clause or sentence as well. Ideally, the word eius should not be used, if ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 6,874
2 votes

Gender of antecedent of "hoc" in phrase "hoc quod"?

No, it does not agree with any noun because there is no noun, and none is implied either. It must be neutral, because if it was masculine or feminine, the meaning would be rather different. Quod X, ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar

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