Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
10

Well, this may obviously be outdated, but G.M. Messing banged out a 3-page treatment of "The Etymology of Lat. Mentula" for the Oct. 1956 Classical Philology (Vol. 51, No. 4, pp. 247–249). His review of the scholarship to that point was Lat. mentula 'membrum virile' has never been satisfactorily etymologized. Of the various suggestions made in the ...


10

Oh, God, the prudish lengths to which dictionaries go to avoid translating profanity correctly! I feel your pain—I too feel cheated and betrayed when this happens. It's like, aren't you supposed to tell me what this word means? Well, "to practice unnatural vice" is not what this word means. I don't know of any dictionaries that do their jobs properly in ...


8

Dictionaries are notoriously bad at describing sex acts. Thankfully, J. N. Adams rectified that with his The Latin Sexual Vocabulary (Baltimore, 1982). I can add little to what he says of the two words (p. 136–137): (vii) Criso and ceueo Latin possessed two technical terms for types of sexual motion (in both cases that of the passive partner), criso ...


6

There is an amusing little book called X-treme Latin, by Henry Beard. It is billed as 'Lingua Latina Extrema, all the Latin you need to know for surviving the 21st century'. It is published in the UK by Headline. If you really want the authentic syntax, this will demonstrate how it ought to be done. Or if, of course, you want the authentic Roman, you will ...


4

Yes. From Plautus' Menaechmi 2.3.389.390: Erotium: Certo, tibi et parasito tuo. Sosicles: Quoi, malum, parasito? Certo haec mulier non sana est satis. which Wiktionary translates as Certainly you did, for yourself and your parasite." "For whom? Fuck, parasite? Surely this woman isn't quite right in her senses. Notable mentions, thanks to ...


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