28 votes
Accepted

What gender should a predicate adjective be to agree with a series of things with different genders?

Bennett's New Latin Grammar (this link will take you to appropriate section) offers several helpful rules of thumb for the agreement of an adjective with multiple nouns. Although I recommend reading ...
  • 37k
11 votes
Accepted

Why is there no predicate in "in vino veritas"?

Pinkster 2015 mentions the following observable trends regarding the omission of esse. it is more frequent with the 3rd person than in the 1st or 2nd; it is more frequent with present indicative ...
  • 11.3k
9 votes
Accepted

Who do I match numerically when using the possessive dative?

What you're calling a "predicate noun" is, in fact, the subject. In the Latin construction, unlike the English translation, the thing possessed is the subject, so the verb has to agree with it. E.g. ...
  • 28.7k
8 votes

What gender should a predicate adjective be to agree with a series of things with different genders?

If the adjective is plural and it refers to words of several genders, I seem to recall the masculine is used by default. But I believe a Roman author would indeed recast a sentence like this, ...
  • 19k
7 votes

Why is there no predicate in "in vino veritas"?

Yes to the first, usually no to the second. In Latin, esse can almost always be dropped if the meaning is clear. This is even true when it's connected to another verb form, like in a perfect passive ...
  • 53.7k
6 votes

Who do I match numerically when using the possessive dative?

The thing being possessed is the subject in this construction. The verb agrees with the subject, but the subject in your example is not the girl. Do not confuse the plural nominative and singular ...
5 votes

Double (identical) subject

I seriously doubt that Pater medicus laborat is a proper translation of "my father works as a doctor." It seems too literal, the Latin laborare is generally not used to talk about a calling, ...
3 votes
Accepted

Double (identical) subject

Pater medicus laborat. Similar constructions do exist in Latin. Here are two examples from Allen & Greenough: êius mortis sedētis ultōrēs (Mil. 79) , you sit as avengers of his death. litterās ...
  • 2,590
2 votes
Accepted

Aristotle's Metaphysics - dative as predicate

συμβαίνω in the sense "happen to" (section A.III.b of the LSJ entry) takes the dative for the person something happens to. In this sentence, the dative it takes is the relative pronoun ᾧ: &...
  • 28.7k
2 votes

Why can’t we wipe the slate clean in Latin?

A comment of yours on another question led me to this interesting question and to an embryonic hypothesis inspired by reading a paper on "Aspect and Assertion in Mandarin Chinese" that ...
  • 2,590

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