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13 votes

Why the use of "eum" instead of "eius" in

Here's the context: Ancilla ānulum gemmātum in digitō dominae pōnit. In quō digitō? In digitō quārtō, nam ānulus ad eum digitum convenit. My translation: The servant girl places the jewelled ring ...
Cairnarvon's user avatar
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12 votes
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Why the use of "eum" instead of "eius" in

Both eum and eius would be grammatically correct, but they mean different things. Eum (from is, ea, id) when modifying a noun is a demonstrative pronoun. The ring fits that finger as opposed to a ...
Kingshorsey's user avatar
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9 votes
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Grammar and Meaning in Context of EIUS

The rule does apply -- it's a syntactic rule, not a semantic one. Since the subjects are lingua etc. rather than justus, the possessives are not reflexive, so eius is used rather than suus. For lex ...
TKR's user avatar
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8 votes
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Mors mea or mors meī?

Another use of the genitive that you've left out is subjective genitive, which is what this is. These are discussed in, e.g., Gildersleeve and Lodge, Latin grammar §363. Allen and Greenough, New Latin ...
cnread's user avatar
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8 votes
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Why "suam" and not "eius" is used in this sentence?

The idea that suus is used when the possessor is the subject is a simplification for beginners. It can be used in a variety of other contexts, generally with a sense along the lines of "her/his ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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7 votes

Why the use of "eum" instead of "eius" in

This is a difficult sentence to translate, and I think the key to translating it is realizing that is, ea, id — in addition to being a third-person pronoun (he, she, it) — can also be a determiner ...
ktm5124's user avatar
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6 votes

Is "their" being masculine or feminine?

The form of suus (and meus and others) only depends on the noun it modifies. The gender, number, or other details of the owner do not matter at all. It might be helpful to think of suus as an ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes

How to Translate "His is better"

It's not a perfect match, but I found this in Seneca (De Beneficiis 5.11.6): Beneficium est quod quis non sua causa dat sed eius, cui dat; is autem, qui sibi beneficium dat, sua causa dat; non est ...
cmw's user avatar
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5 votes

Why the use of "eum" instead of "eius" in

“…to that finger.” Not “to his/her finger”. It’s emphasizing a specific finger as opposed to emphasizing the person. The finger must have been referenced earlier in the text.
Stephen Darrenkamp's user avatar
5 votes
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How to Translate "His is better"

Actually, I'm not sure that you cannot say ejus est melior. Gildersleeve and Lodge, 3rd edition, at #362, Remark 3, say "Sometimes the governing word [of a genitive] is omitted where it can be ...
Figulus's user avatar
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4 votes

How to Translate "His is better"

Please note that your examples are either ungrammatical or only grammatical if understood elliptically: Eius videt may be wrong (but citation needed …), but so is "he sees his." And "...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
4 votes
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Nouns in locative in connection to adjectives (Does every adjective have a locative?)

Most adjectives are not attested in the locative form. (However, the rules for putting an adjective into the locative case are not complicated, so it's usually easy to predict the form if you know the ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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4 votes

Mors mea or mors meī?

An unlearned but hopefully useful answer. Searching a large corpus of texts gives: mors mea: 2,612 hits mors mei: 26 hits mors tua: 4,821 hits mors tui: 80 hits mors sua: 969 hits mors sui: 49 hits ...
luchonacho's user avatar
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3 votes

How do I say "this is mine"?

It usually depends on where you want the emphasis to lie. If you simply need to make a general assertion that you are the owner of the house, then you might say haec est domus mea — 'this is my house'...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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2 votes

Why "suam" and not "eius" is used in this sentence?

Although suus (the reflexive pronoun) usually refers to the subject of the sentence, it can refer to other nouns in the same clause or sentence as well. Ideally, the word eius should not be used, if ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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1 vote

How do I say "this is mine"?

Parva mihi domus est sed ianua aperta; 'My house is small but the door is open.' (lit. doors) This is the first line of Mus ariddle found in Symphosii Scholastici Ænigmata given in full on Gianni A. ...
Hugh's user avatar
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