Hot answers tagged

13

I think you're still assuming that English-style word order is in some sense natural or default, despite your correct disclaimer that "sentences that appear 'scrambled' in English might not be perceived to be so in Latin". For example, you refer to "moving unam all the way to the end", but of course it hasn't been moved anywhere; its ...


13

I suspect that any reply to this broad a question will always be rife with conjecture, but the reason for the convoluted word order is always a combination of the metrical cadence, and the effect that word order has on the listener. It is generally accepted that literature was usually read aloud in ancient Rome - we can even assume that lyrical poetry was (...


12

Accusative of respect: 'He's old/an old man with respect to his hair(s)' – i.e., his hair is that of an old man. Draconis has alluded to this in the other answer, but it's worth making explicit that τὰς φρένας in the last line is the same sort of accusative (whatever name one calls it by): 'He's young in respect to his mind/heart' – i.e., he's young at heart....


11

When you see "daggers" (properly obeli) in a critical text, it means the word is (or words are) corrupt. If the editor cannot make sense of the meaning, they are obelized, which is essentially a shrug of the shoulders. So it isn't quite right to say that Müller "reads" accusatius here. Generally, if no one can make the sentence ...


11

To add on a bit to cnread's (completely valid) answer: this is a form that's also called the "accusative of body parts" or the "Greek accusative" (since it wasn't common in Latin until Greek-influenced writers started imitating it—even though Greek has a whole bunch of other accusative constructions). It usually specifies a body part that ...


6

The Greek word that means briny is ἁλμυρός and appears in both Homer and Hesiod. For example: Grant lovely song and celebrate the holy race of the deathless gods who are for ever, those that were born of Earth and starry Heaven and gloomy Night and them that briny Sea did rear. (Hesiod, Theogony, 106-108) However it doesn't appear as a description of the ...


6

That looks like a program trying to guess where to pause within a verse. It seems to identify three kinds of possible pauses: A bucolic diaeresis between the fourth and the fifth foot, indicated by a broken bar. A masculine caesura within a foot, right after the stressed first syllable, indicated by a solid bar. A feminine caesura within a foot, between the ...


5

Can we say that Latin Hexameter did not exist before Ennius (as implied later in this article)? Not necessarily written Hexameter is in question. We can't say for sure, but Ennius' hexameters are the first extant Latin hexameters. If it existed prior to him, we do not have an example of it, and his immediate predecessors (Andronicus and Naevius) wrote in ...


4

I don't know how much you want changed, so I'll just tackle your two questions for now. What about: Super omnia amorem desideras, "You desire love above all." (cf. Aeneid 9.283) Is there a reason you're in the plural here? But anyway, the grammar breaks down heavily here. Why is it vocative? The lack of punctuation in the English is actually an ...


4

In many Greek meters there's a rule by which a long syllable can be replaced with two shorts ("resolution"). This is what has happened with προσεκύνει in this line: the first two short syllables count as one long. Dividing the line into feet we get θεῶν ἀλη|θῶς προσεκύνει | τε κἀτίμα where the metrical scheme is ˘ ¯ ˘ ¯ | ¯ ˘˘ ˘ ¯ | ˘ ¯ ¯ ¯ The ...


3

I'm doubtful that the diaeresis would be used in this way: you can't generally break diphthongs into two short vowels metri causa. There are occasional examples in Homer of disyllabic scansion of what in Classical Greek terms would be a diphthong, e.g. ἐύ for εὖ, but those are archaisms, not applications of a productive rule. That said, the accentuation ...


3

According to Hagen 1994, the etymologically expected form of the accusative was Ζῆν (compare Latin diem), but this became Ζῆνα by analogy with regular third-declension nouns. It's unclear if the original author of the epics understood the accusative as Ζῆν or Ζῆνα, or if it was changed through the years in later recitation, or what exactly. Almost all ...


3

It appears this phenomenon is not unique to the O interjection. The The Elements of Latin Grammar, etc p.175 notes: Ah, O, hei, heu, pro, si, vae, vah, and also most other monosyllables are seldom elided A Copious Latin Grammar p.383, is more restrictive in his list (and specifically mentions "interjections" rather than any monosyllabel), but he ...


1

They seem to be grouping choliambics under iambics, of which they are a modification. The Satyricon poem is listed in that category: http://mizar.unive.it/mqdq/public/testo/testo/ordinata/pf990108.


1

Thanks to @d_e, @cmw and @brianpck for your corrections and suggestions. Regarding (1), we went with "super omnia amorem desideratis." Regarding (2), the author decided to take out the line in question, which saved a great deal of trouble. Your points about possible unwanted connotations of "maneo" and "consumo" were well made ...


1

I recommend listening to the sung recordings made by Tyrtarion. Here's a playlist of their work. The melodies and delivery are meant to highlight metrical patterns and the Vivarium Novum academy (which teaches through the medium of Latin) actually uses this as part of metrical pedagogy. Btw, I don't know if this helps, but I've also started a playlist of my ...


1

This is a simple-minded study of a very specific case of synizesis to get a concrete numerical example. I am looking at the letters -eo- (next to each other in the same word) in the first two books of the Aeneid. A corpus search gives 281 hits for the whole Aeneid, so any results will have some significance but the amount of work is not utterly unreasonable. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible