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27

This means "illa" definitely doesn't refer to "dies". But it does! The word dies can be feminine, and it is here. The feminine gender is rarer but it is the typical choice for a special day like an appointment or a deadline. That's why it was chosen here. For details, see this question about gender variation in dies.


12

It is the feminine nominative and refers to dies. It means “that day.” You do not say why you think you can definitely rule it out, but I guess you think dies is masculine, which is indeed the case. But it is also often feminine. Generally speaking, it is feminine only when referring to a set day, an appointed time. This does arguably apply to the day of ...


12

This page (in Italian) has three bilingual Italian-Latin poems. "Salve Regina" by Anacleto Bendazzi (1883-1982) seems to be the Christian-themed one (though I don't know either Italian or Latin well enough to translate it myself): Salve Regina ! Te saluto, o pia, nostra tutela in tenebrosa via, in sinistra terrifica procella benigna stella. ...


7

First, let us check all vowel lengths: tŭm vērō ĕxŏrĭtŭr clāmŏr rīpaequĕ lăcūsquĕ A syllable with a short vowel can be long (by position). The standard assumption is that all possible elisions happen, and that is the case here too. There are two possibilities for a ...


5

Additionally, note that "irae" in "Dies irae" is in the genitive. "illa", in the nominative, can't match a noun in the genitive case. :)


4

Chiasms are mostly used in poetry and high rhetoric, for dramatic or or playful effect. What they do is emphasise the words that seem inverted, draw the reader or listener's attention. I would say the frequency and effect of chiasms were not so different from how they are used in the modern languages. I think the 'C' in ABCBA could be anything; it depends ...


4

This passage (Met. 1.61-2) is about the creation of the world, and the winds are taking up their allotted quarters. Eurus isn't blowing towards the East, he's taking up his station there to become the East Wind. (Btw subdita here isn't "submissive to", but simply "placed under".)


3

The morphological issues are explained already. In any case, I hope that a literal translation will help: "The day of wrath, that wellknown day" About the use of illa, in this context, I would say that it is used to indicate some well-known or celebrated object, equivalent to the ancient, the wellknown, the famous. You can find this use here: Lewis&...


3

The first vowel in vero is long, the second vowel of vero is elided away, and the first syllable of exoritur is long by position (because 'x' counts as two consonants since it's pronounced 'ks'). You seem to have the remainder correct. So it starts with a spondee, and all elisions occur. It's worth noting that you can deduce from the meter that the first ...


3

The Saturnian was (probably) stress-based, not weight-based. To borrow from another answer of mine: In a question about Old Latin meters, an anonymous user brought up Mercado's convincing argument that the Saturnian was based on accent. The idea isn't new, but Mercado backs it up with some nice information-theoretical analysis: basically, the ...


3

I think both the literal reading "man and arms" and the more creative reading "armed man" are justified at superficial level. The second one does indeed look weird, but is based on a figure of speech called hendiadys. (There are slightly different forms of this concept. I learned to call it hendiadyoin.) The name of this figure of speech means "one through ...


2

Elision in Latin is a complicated topic and I only know basic information about it. I think it is normal in any period to elide final -ae, as in meae, before a following vowel. András Cser ("Aspects of the Phonology and Morphology of Classical Latin", 2016) puts it like this: Word-final [aj] is elided in poetry just like any vowel (including the nasal ...


2

I can't come up with an exact match now, but I think Ovid would be a good candidate to start looking for. He wrote a lot about love. He also wrote Tristia ("Sorrows"), which he write after going into exile, but after a brief search I didn't find something expression the "no regrets, look back happy" sentiment. Homer, Sappho and Catullus would be other ...


1

Yes! Nemo est qui... is a common enough formula in Latin, "there is no one who...". Since nemo can be used with est there is no reason it cannot be used with sum. Indeed the phrase nemo sum homo is attested. See here.


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