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16 votes
Accepted

Why Is This Noun in the Singular?

It is because cunae, -arum, f, is the word for a single crib. The singular cuna is never used. This is similar to how castra is a single camp. Such a word is called a plurale tantum (plural: pluralia ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
12 votes
Accepted

One Syllabus Many Syllabontes?

I think Trask's/Millar's claim is misleading. (Note: From now on, I will refer to the author as "Trask," even though it might be that this comes from Millar's revision.) As you note, "...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 41.5k
9 votes
Accepted

Why is "astra" in plural in this sentence?

Mathematici Graeci saepe lunam astraque intuiti sunt Greek mathematicians often contemplated the moon and stars. It's plural accusative because the speaker thinks the Greeks thought about more than ...
lly's user avatar
  • 776
8 votes
Accepted

Grammatical number agreement in this sentence

In this sentence, "dies mensis primus" is one noun phrase, serving as the sentence's subject ("the first day of the month"), "nominatur" is the verb, and "kalendae&...
Agnes's user avatar
  • 466
7 votes
Accepted

Is there a singular of 'mānēs'?

Judging by the entry in Lewis and Short, the plural is also used to refer to a single entity. Section I.B mentions examples like manes Anchisae/conjugis/Virginiae/Galbae. The same section also ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes

Is there a singular of 'mānēs'?

Appius has the singular attested: In sing.: “nomine Manem deum nuncupant,” App. de Deo Socr. 15, p. 50, 19. He's a bit late, but I suppose this proves it's possible. Running a PHI search "manem ...
cmw's user avatar
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4 votes
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Why is "promissum" (singular) used here and not "promissa" (plural)?

A promissum, -i is a frequently substantivized perfect passive participle of promitto. In this sense, it's just a "promise," and facere promissum is one way of saying, "to keep [not ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 41.5k
3 votes

Why is "promissum" (singular) used here and not "promissa" (plural)?

It's absolutely them making a promise, promissum. This is the object of the ACI. The infinitive of the ACI is facturos esse and the subject (in accusative) is eos. The object of this verb in ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes

Why is "astra" in plural in this sentence?

This is an excellent question. Let's consider the sentence Mathematici Graeci saepe lunam astraque intuiti sunt. The -que at the end of "astra" is called the enclitic -que. It is a special ...
ktm5124's user avatar
  • 12k

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