Hot answers tagged

8

According to Merriam-Webster Dictionary, the first known usage of telos was in 1904, which is fairly recent, relatively speaking. The word doesn't appear in any old dictionaries before that time. Most modern dictionaries list teloi as the plural form and sometimes teloses as an alternative. Wiktionary was the only one that I saw that also showed tele as ...


6

The classical word for "monad" is μονάς, plural μονάδες. μονάδα, plural -ες, is Modern Greek. μονάδαι looks like a pseudo-classical plural of the MG word. Where did you find it?


5

Telea (τέλεα) is a valid Greek plural (not contracted), and it looks better in English: the -a plural is not unusual for Greek (and Latin) borrowings, and the uncontracted -e- is similar to the related word teleology (not contracted * telulogy). An internet search reveals that this has already been used as a plural in English (a 2012 book, a 1986 Usenet ...


5

Apparently an early usage was in inheritance law, in contrast with "per stirpes". Suppose A has children B and C, and B has child D, while C has children E and F. If A outlives his children but not his grandchildren, then with a per capita rule, D, E, and F each get 1/3 of the estate, but under a per stirpes rule, D gets 1/2 and E and F get 1/4 each. In ...


4

The singular forms of uterque mean either 'each x (out of 2),' which is also singular concept in English, or 'both xs,' which is a plural concept in English. The plural forms mean either 'each group of xs (out of 2 groups),' which is a singular concept in English, or 'both groups of xs,' which is also a plural concept in English. In the Tacitus passage that ...


4

Militiae is the genitive singular of militia, which is grammatically singular, but which (like other collective nouns) designates a plurality. Laudantium and dicentium are genitive plural. They agree with militiae ad sensum, but not ad litteram. It is like when you say in English “the whole class are doing their homework”. “Class” is grammatically singular, ...


3

Both īma and summīs are neuter plural in this case: "the lowest things" and "the highest things". The adjectives are being used in a sort of general sense here, rather than referring to any specific objects—God is reconciling everything that is lowly with everything that is exalted, without any particular lowly and exalted things in mind.


2

In my interpretation, multitudo is accompanied by two discrete genitive constructions: the partitive genitive militiae caelestis (so, not the whole heavenly host but just much of it), and then a genitive indicating the contents of the multitude, the substantives laudantium and dicentium: a multitude of the heavenly host, consisting of beings who are praising ...


2

It is true that this may be considered an example of constructio ad sensum et non ad litteram. Nevertheless I prefer another perspective: if laudantium and dicentium are substantivized participles that indicate the composition of the militia, we could even translate as follows "...a large multitude of the heavenly militia of those who praised God..." ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible