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11

πῶς is widely attested as an alternative for ὅπως in indirect interrogative clauses. Here are some examples of this use with the verb σκέπτομαι: Isocr. 1,35: σκόπει πρῶτον πῶς τὰ ἑαυτοῦ διῴκησεν And. 124,2: σκέψασθε πῶς γέγονε, καὶ πῶς ἐποιήσατ’ αὐτόν Xen. mem. 2,1,16: σκεψώμεθα δὲ καὶ τοῦτο, πῶς οἱ δεσπόται τοῖς τοιούτοις οἰκέταις χρῶνται Pl. ...


10

As is often the case with these quotes, it's actually a summary of a summary of Plato. We see an early version in Ernst Cassirer's 1944 essay An Essasy on Man: It is impossible—says Plato in the Republic—to implant truth in the soul of a man as it is to give the power of seeing to a man born blind...Here we have the new, indirect answer to the question &...


9

Yes, Plato makes this direct connection, and it does appear to be attested. He does this in the Phaedrus, 244b-c: τόδε μὴν ἄξιον ἐπιμαρτύρασθαι, ὅτι καὶ τῶν παλαιῶν οἱ τὰ ὀνόματα τιθέμενοι οὐκ αἰσχρὸν ἡγοῦντο οὐδὲ ὄνειδος μανίαν: οὐ γὰρ ἂν τῇ καλλίστῃ τέχνῃ, ᾗ τὸ μέλλον κρίνεται, αὐτὸ τοῦτο τοὔνομα ἐμπλέκοντες μανικὴν ἐκάλεσαν. ἀλλ᾽ ὡς καλοῦ ὄντος, ὅταν ...


8

The verb doesn't actually mean simply 'to do many things' – though that idea could conceivably be rendered by πολυπράττειν, if such a verb existed (it isn't attested in LSJ), or by πολλὰ πράττειν. Instead, it's a denominative verb (a verb formed from the stem of a substantive or adjective). In this case, it's formed from the adjective πολυπράγμων, '...


7

The phrase ὡς ἔπος εἰπεῖν is an expression, meaning something like "so to say". So a very rough translation would be, "they have said (perfect tense) nothing truthful, so to say". Apparently, "they said nothing truthful" is itself also an expression. As to ὡς ἔπος εἰπεῖν, I believe ὡς is not seldom used with an infinitive rather than a finite verb, so ...


7

This is a bit of a convoluted sentence! The key is that the three genitives here have nothing to do with each other—one is a genitive of agent, one is a genitive of quantity a specific idiom, and one is the object of a verb that governs the genitive. …δ᾽ οὖν καὶ… And seriously… …ἐγὼ…αὐτὸς… …I myself… …ὀλίγου… …almost… …ἐμαυτοῦ ἐπελαθόμην …forgot myself… …ὑπ᾽...


7

ἑαυτοῦ: this is reflexive because it's referring all the way back to the subject of the verb of speech that introduced this whole passage of indirect discourse. It's an "indirect reflexive": see the discussion in Smyth 1225ff. οἱ: this is not the nom. pl. of the definite article, but the enclitic dat. sg. of the third-person pronoun, "(to) him". The way to ...


5

Your main question has been well answered by Penelope and in the article linked by brianpck: when there is a coordination of more than one subject, the verb can agree with the entire coordination or just with the nearest member. So I'll address your other questions, about particles. First, a general point about translating Greek particles: don't get too ...


4

λέγοντες It makes sense to construe as one unit the following phrase: τοῦ γυναικείου πέρι νόμου λέγοντες [We who are] speaking about the law concerning women This is the subject of the sentence: I construe φῶμεν as a hortatory subjunctive and ὥσπερ as a way to "apologize" for the image of a wave. We thus get: τοῦτο μὲν τοίνυν ἓν ὥσπερ κῦμα ...


4

This is an adverbial use of the relative and has its own entry in LSJ. It's used in comparative clauses, for example. LSJ: ᾗ, dat. sg. fem. of relat. Pron. ὅς, ἥ, ὅ, in adverb. sense ... II. of Manner, how, as. Smyth (§2463): Comparative clauses of quality or manner are introduced by ὡς as, ὥσπερ, καθάπερ just as, ὅπως, ᾗ, ὅπῃ, ᾗπερ as


4

Apparently, two or more subjects can occur with a singular verb, with the verb understood to be agreeing with the nearest or most important subject (Smyth 963 & 966 (c)). Perhaps this is what is happening here? Perhaps Socrates is wishing to draw attention to the athletic training in particular. He certainly does proceed to play on the apparent ...


4

As you say, one can explicate an implied agent from passive verbs based on context. The most literal (but probably unusable) translation would be "there is to be assigned". Usually the impersonal pronoun one can be used to make it somewhat more palpable. Whenever context supplies enough information that we know who or what is supposed to do the assigning, we ...


2

εἶπον is the suppletive aorist and εἴρηκα the suppletive perfect of φημί or λέγω. It is a question of definition whether you regard them as three separate verbs, or as different tenses of the same verb.


2

Instead of answering your last and main question as stated, I will try to argue why it is not answerable. The reason is in the answer to the first question: the description is not accurate. The word imperium has a broad range of meanings. From L&S: command, order, direction, authority, command, control, supreme power, sovereignty, sway, dominion, empire,...


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