50

The Latin language is named after the area it was spoken in — or the people that spoke it. (It is impossible to distinguish the two.) Latin, by name, is the language of Latium (Lazio in today's Italian), not the language of Rome. Alternatively, you can see it as the language of the tribe of Latins. Latinus is the Latin adjective meaning "related to ...


31

The Catholic Church seems to use (say, Archiepiscopus) Neo-Eboracensis very consistently. See, for example: here for 'FRANCISCUS titulo Ss. Ioannis et Pauli Presbyter Cardinalis SPELLMAN, Archiepiscopus Neo-Eboracensis.' As they use Latin as an official language, that's probably the most official you ever get!


23

Update: Now with macrons! (Macrons reproduced as in my source.) The book Clavis Latina II, grammatica & exercitia by Maija-Leena Kallela and Erkki Palmén (I advertised this series for self-study here) contains a list of many modern countries as an appendix. In my experience the series is well researched and reliable. Some countries have several spelling ...


23

The word latin comes from latinus, "of Latium," a region in central Italy. In this territory, around the turn of the first millennium BC, lived a tribe known as the Latins, and their language was the immediate predecessor of Old Latin. Not coincidentally, Rome was founded in this region around the 8th century BC. Other peoples were involved as well, such ...


16

Just a few days ago I was looking up the scientific name of the Northern Waterthrush: the Parkesia noveboracensis. The name occurs in several other names. However, I haven't found an example of it being used in actual Latin text, so an attested form (like the above Neo-eboracensis) is probably preferable.


11

The Latin language has been founded by a nation called the Latins. Check the information below as quoted from Wikipedia: The Latins referred originally to an Italic tribe in ancient central Italy. They were living between 1200 BC and 1000 BC. From about 1000 BC, the Latins inhabited the small region known to the Romans as Old Latium (Latium Vetus), that ...


10

I did some research and it appears to be Rötz - see, for instance, another treatise held by the British Library written by the same author and typeset (published?) by the same person as well: cf. "Gedruckt zu Rötz bey Christoph Joseph Hueth, Wiennerischen Universitäts-Buchdrucker." Finally, this confirms our hypothesis that Rötz is a town: Some ...


10

The suffix -landia is definitely derived from Germanic land. It has no clear cognates outside the Germanic languages and there are some hypotheses that it is a loan from some pre-indogermanic European language and/or that there is a connection to the Basque language. I see no better Latin alternatives for Islandia or Nederlandia, but Finnia is definitely ...


10

Plural place names should have plural verbs. A very simple case of this is Athenae, -arum (Athens). Here's an illuminating example from Cicero: in quam cum intueor, maxime mihi occurrunt, Attice, et quasi lucent Athenae tuae, qua in urbe primum se orator extulit primumque etiam monumentis et litteris oratio est coepta mandari. (Cicero, Brutus 7) ...


9

When you write a story in Latin, whether translating or not, you have two goals: You tell a story. You use Latin. You want to do both well, of course. But there are situations where good storytelling and good Latin are contradictory goals. A place name should be easily recognized (goal 1) but preferably also a declinable Latin word (goal 2). I think the ...


9

It is indeed a second declension word. It is used in the plural. You can confirm this on the Lewis and Short dictionary: Delphi , orum, m., Δελφοί, I.the famous city of the oracle of Apollo in Phocis, now Kastri Understandably, the word comes from Greek, being a Greek city and all. The Greek word, Δελφοί, is also used in the plural. Δελφοί , ῶν, οἱ, A....


9

You could use this site: https://pleiades.stoa.org/. It is a great tool which provides data about ancient names of cities and places. It gives scientifically approved coordinates of places, detailed informations about their names and further bibliographical references. Here is the city of Marʿaš with all the names along the ages. As you can see, they ...


8

What you have written is grammatically correct and there is no conflict. The subject of dicit is nomen and of continet is prima (provincia). Your actual question doesn't cover your example, but your request is perfectly clear. There are two kinds of plural noun. Some, such as hiberna (winter quarters), moenia (town walls) and tenebrae (darkness) are only ...


8

A colleague asked me about this a while ago. I agree with that colleague and with you that to native speakers of Dutch it would be absurd (or at least ridiculous) to stress the antepenult. As for standard rules of stress, it seems to me that it's a bit hard to know (a) which vowels are long or short here and (b) to what extent such rules apply in, let's say, ...


7

It is a 17th-century Latinisation of the Anglo-Saxon name for the town: "The term is derived from Cantabrigia, a medieval Latin name for Cambridge invented on the basis of the Anglo-Saxon name Cantebrigge." Cantebrigge, also known as Grentebrige, is itself an evolution of the earlier name Grantabrycge - bridge over the Granta. The Roman name for the town ...


6

The best reference for such questions is Brills’s New Pauly. Eckart Olshausen (Universität Stuttgart), the author of the book Einführung in die Historische Geographie der Alten Welt (1991), writes that “[a]s a term of Roman imperialism Mare Nostrum first occurs in Caes. B Gall. 5,1,2, whereas mare mediterraneum is a medieval word formation (cf. Isid. Orig. ...


6

There were generally three options for foreign names in Latin: The name had a Latin-like ending on it already. If it ended in -a, for instance, it would probably be treated as a first-declension feminine. The name was given a new Latin ending, and declined appropriately. Mariscum for instance was given the second-declension neuter ending -um. The name was ...


6

This is a rather wordy response to your comment 'If there are reasons to believe that the question is unanswerable, explaining those reasons would make a good answer. It is certainly not what I expected, but it might well be the correct answer. It's useful to be aware of the things we simply don't know!' I'm not surprised that searching Packhum gave you ...


6

The selenographical names can perhaps be viewed as appositions and would as such not be ungrammatical (Latin appositions may be incongruent in number or gender, like urbs Athenae). In that case both parts would have to be declined in parallel, e.g. Videsne Montes Agricolam? In my opinion one should take this as scientific terminology based on Latin, not ...


5

This kind of thing is codified in Bennett's New Latin Grammar at http://www.thelatinlibrary.com/bennett.html#sect150 The entries that you seek are: Names of persons take the suffixes: -ānus, -iānus, -īnus; as, —Catōniānus, belonging to Cato; Plautīnus, belonging to Plautus. Names of nations take the suffixes -icus, -ius; as ,—Germānicus, German; Thrācius, ...


5

Cicero (Att. 8,3) and Pliny (3. 5. 6) each refer to mare superum. Lemprière's Classical Dictionary, which often has a wealth of detail on such topics, has nothing of direct use, but from its rather obscure information I deduce that the name Tyrrhenum Mare is reliably old: for example, Tyrrheus was the keeper of flocks for king Latinus, while Tyrrhenus, son ...


5

The trouble with forms like Florentia and Hepatopolis is that nobody is going to connect them with the English names unless they've been clued in (well, they might for Hepatopolis, but that would be kind of a joke). I know I don't automatically think of blooming [flowers] when I hear the name Bloomington. In my mind, there are clear precedents in the ...


5

Both Melitae and in Melita seem to appear: Cicero, Epistulae ad Atticum 3.4.1: Statim iter Brunddisium versus contuli ante diem rogationis, ne et Sicca, apud quem eram, periret et quod Melitae esse non licebat. Cicero, Epistulae ad Atticum 10.7.1: …Melitae aut alio in loco simili… Cicero, Epistulae ad Atticum 5.19.3: De Patrone et tuis condiscipulis, ...


5

In Latin this is best achieved via adjectives. For example, "Susan of London" would be Susanna Londiniensis. I based the adjective on the Latin name of London, Londinium. For a more modern version, you can go with Londoniensis, but I prefer the more classical one. (It's a matter of taste whether you want to Latinify the first name Susan to Susanna, but I ...


5

How about Novieboracensis or Noviboracensis? I have no idea how bipartite city names are handled classically, though.


4

The “Dictionary of British Place names” writes: Grontabricc c.745, Cantebrigie 1086 (db). ‘Bridge on the River Granta’. Celtic river-name (see Grantchester) + OE brycg. The change from Grant- to Cam- is due to Norman influence. Cambridgeshire (OE scīr ‘district’) is first referred to in the 11th cent. The later river-name Cam is a back-formation ...


4

I would second Tom Cotton’s suggestions of Bloomingtona or Blumingtona. Bloomingtonia or Blumingtonia doesn't seem incorrect either. (If you want to completely assimilate the word to Latin phonotactics—which I don't think is necessary—you could simplify the consonant cluster "ngt" to "nt".) One argument I can think of in favor of using &...


4

I'm not sure if this works, but perhaps this is an idea worth sharing. Compound city names don't tend to sound authentic in Latin, so I don't even want to try to translate "blooming town" into Latin. I believe the -ton in Bloomington has its origin in the word "town", but I have not confirmed it in this particular case. It would also be possible to treat "...


4

Pompeius probably comes from the Oscan praenomen Pompo, which is the equivalent of the Latin Quintus, as its root is pompe - traceable to the Greek pente, i.e. "five". The name of the city might have the same origin - quoting the English Wikipedia page, this could suggest that either the community consisted of five hamlets or, perhaps, it was settled by the ...


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