New answers tagged

7

In a third-conjugation verb, [g] at the end of a present tense stem generally alternates with [k], written as ⟨c⟩, before the [t] of the past participle/supine suffix. I believe the phonemic representations would usually be given as /g/ and /k/ respectively; if that is correct, this is not a case where "/g/ is written as c" but a case where /g/ ...


3

Latin doesn’t regularly elide the e in re-. The prefix re- has a variant red-; this is sometimes found before vowels, but re- can also be found before vowels. If you’re trying to coin a word based on Latin tendencies, I think the biggest issue would not be sandhi of the parts, but how the parts are put together (and which parts you use). The compounding ...


3

Sure. Some examples: ὄψ 'voice', cf. Skt. vacati 'say' ὤψ 'eye', cf. Lat. oculus χέρνιψ 'basin for washing hands', from root of νίζω 'wash', cf. Skt. nenekti 'id.' λείπω 'leave', cf. Lat. linquō ἀμείβω 'exchange', cf. Lat. migrō σέβομαι 'revere', cf. Skt. tyajati 'abandon' νείφει 'snow', cf. Lat nix, nivis (I'm listing thematic verbs here even though one ...


5

This is just to provide evidence for cōs-cōtis from classical poets: saepe etiam duris errando in cotibus alas (Vergilius, Georgica, 4.203) cote cruenta (Horatius, Carmina 2.8.16) nil tanti est. Ergo fungar vice cotis, acutum (Horatius, Ars Poetica, 304) All of these scan right if and only if cot- is read with a long vowel. These are all the examples of ...


2

This merger is thought to have happened in the 5th-4th centuries BC. More specifically, it's a monophthongization, in which [ei ou] became [e: o:]. ("Genuine/spurious diphthongs" is a bit of a misnomer -- in Classical Greek, ΕΙ ΟΥ are not diphthongs but digraphs which stand for long vowels; some of these long vowels historically developed from ...


Top 50 recent answers are included