11 votes

Is Nietzsche's proposed etymology of "bonus" (good) correct?

This etymology is not accepted by modern scholars, though the ultimate origin of "bonus" is contested. I cannot get de Vaan to scan properly, but here is Walde: bonus „gut“, altlat. duonus, noch ...
  • 16.5k
7 votes
Accepted

How would Roman name an Übermensch?

My vote would be for homo superior for two reasons. First, linguistically, adding the Über- prefix does create something of a comparative. The Übermensch is more than a man. Homo superus by itself ...
  • 45.1k
5 votes
Accepted

Is Nietzsche's proposed etymology of "bonus" (good) correct?

It is plausible that bonus is related to bellum/duellum Nietzsche is correct about bonus coming from an older form starting with du-: not only is this consistent with known Latin sound changes, we ...
  • 24.1k
5 votes
Accepted

Is Kant's "De Mundi Sensibilis atque Intelligibilis Forma et Principiis" available online in its Latin original?

Is Kant's "De Mundi Sensibilis atque Intelligibilis Forma et Principiis" available online in its Latin original? Hard to answer with a sound "no", as I might end up being proved wrong. However, I ...
  • 12.2k
5 votes

Why did the Romans link Autumn with earth and melancholy, Spring with air and sanguine, and Winter with water and phelgm?

The (Pseudo-)Hippocratean treatise “On the nature of man” proposes the theory of the four humours (blood, phlegm, yellow bile, and the imaginary black bile) as an explanation not only for diseases, ...
  • 16.5k
5 votes

What is "I am not the only conscious being" translated into Latin?

I would go with something like: Nōn sōlus sum quī conscĭus sim. I am not the only one who is conscious. Cf. the line in the Satyricon: ait Trimalchio: 'solus sum qui vera Corinthea habeam.' ...
  • 45.1k
4 votes
Accepted

Use of 'eo' in a sentence

I would take it as ablative showing cause, so that it just anticipates the causal quod that follows. Therefore, eo, quod means something like 'for this [very] reason, namely because' or simply '...
  • 18.3k
4 votes
Accepted

English translation of a philosophical quote from Spinoza in Latin

Notandum "to be noted" ( compare: memorandum 'to be remembered') This is followed by indirect speech: 'that...' with Accusative certam aliquam causam 'some sure CAUSE;' and Infinitive, dari ...
  • 8,515
3 votes

Instructional book for the Medieval philosophy student

The following book is a good start. It doesn't have literal translations, but it does provide a lot of vocabulary and grammatical guidance. Reading Medieval Latin by Keith Sidwell From the blurb: "...
  • 8,421
3 votes
Accepted

How would you translate ἡ τοῦ ἀγαθοῦ ἰδέα into Latin?

A corpus search shows some hits for idea. You can use the Latinized word idea as such, or you can use the Greek word with Greek declension and alphabet. By far the simplest choice is idea, and it ...
3 votes

How would Roman name an Übermensch?

The word history of Übermensch is discussed extensively in the DWB (link below). The word was first used in Protestant theological writings and later adopted famously by Nietzsche. In both cases, it ...
  • 16.5k
1 vote

How would Roman name an Übermensch?

The general Latin word for this is heros which is derived from Greek and related to our word "hero" and means a man of vastly superior abilities and quality. Another word used for the ...
  • 5,008
1 vote

Is Kant's "De Mundi Sensibilis atque Intelligibilis Forma et Principiis" available online in its Latin original?

Only now, somewhat accidentally while searching for another original source, did I find out that there is at least one online rendition of the Latin original of De Mundi Sensibilis atque ...
  • 753

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