10

I give some real examples taken from medieval latin: ex his praemissis haec sequitur conclusio (Saint Lawrence of Brindisi) sequitur ex praemissis ista conclusio (Ockham) haec / ista conclusio sequitur ex praemissis (Ockham) ex praedictis praemissis sequitur ista conclusio (Ockham) conclusio sequitur ex talibus praemissis (Ockham) ...


10

In classical Latin, the ablative of comparatives could end on -i, although -e is probably more common. Here are a few quotations that I think must be conceded to contain ablatives: Cornelius Nepos, Vitae Ca. 2.2.2: … ibi cum diutius moraretur, P. Scipio Africanus consul iterum, cuius in priori consulatu quaestor fuerat, uoluit eum de prouincia depellere …...


8

The third part of Descartes's Principia Philosophiae (pg. 78 of this edition) contains a more literal translation of "all things unchanged": Si autem caeteris immutatis, contingat ut minuatur illa vis... Note that I only found 150 G-hits for this phrase: I highly recommend the (almost) exactly equivalent and far more prevalent ceteris paribus. If you are ...


8

The sentence has more than one possible meaning in English that might slightly alter the way you may want to translate it into Latin. Suppose that you want to put emphasis in something like the fact that a group of individuals usually lacks the complete unity of a single organism/person/entity. This seems an obvious meaning for the sentence, especially ...


6

Latin does indeed use the term philosophia, -ae, from the Greek φιλοσοφία,. Romans acknowledged that this was a Greek term: Ita fit ut mater omnium bonarum rerum sapientia, a quoius amore Graeco uerbo philosophia nomen inuenit, qua nihil a dis immortalibus uberius, nihil florentius, nihil praestabilius hominum uitae datum est. (Cicero, De Legibus 1.58)...


6

First off, the actual principle was usually called ex falso quodlibet or ex contradictione quodlibet in Latin philosophy literature. That said, if you want a literal translation of "principle of explosion," crepitus is probably not a good word for it. Lewis and Short translate crepitus as "a rattling, creaking, clattering, clashing, rustling, a noise, etc.," ...


6

My impression is that fortiori, priori and posteriori are ablative forms, but they have been declined badly — from the classical point of view. Making this mistake is quite easy. Both -e and -ī appear as singular ablative endings in the third declensions. For adjectives, -ī is always used in positive (ie. neither comparative nor superlative) and -e ...


5

I find Cicero's De Natura Deorum fairly easily decipherable. The subject matter is less abstrusely technical than much philosophical writing, and the fact that it's written as a dialogue, or really a series of polemical speeches, also helps.


5

For those unfamiliar with this terminology, this question refers to medieval mnemonic names for syllogisms, mostly drawn from Aristotelian logic. All valid syllogisms, along with their names, are available here. The names "Barbara," "Celarent," and "Darii" (as well as the fourth first figure mood which you seem to have left out: "Ferio") are obviously ...


4

"Eleatica" indeed seems to be the correct way to refer to the "Eleatic school," founded by Parmenides. This book includes on pg. 62 a section titled, De Secta Eleatica. Although I can find no written examples in medieval or modern Latin of eleatistica (by which I presume you mean "Eleatic-imitating"), I think a convincing analogy can be made with the more ...


4

Given that syllogismus is masculine, and to indicate anything over which you exercise an activity you have to use in + ablative, if I have correctly understand what you mean, the correctly translation could be: additionem in primo, secundo, et tertio syllogismo which however means "the addition over the first, second, and third syllogism" (to add ...


4

The (Pseudo-)Hippocratean treatise “On the nature of man” proposes the theory of the four humours (blood, phlegm, yellow bile, and the imaginary black bile) as an explanation not only for diseases, but for a large number of natural phenomena, including the four seasons, each of which is associated with one of the humours. This association is as logical or ...


3

If you find something not wished for (desideratum), then surely it is irrelevant? The word for this, then, is alienus, whuch used substantively becomes alienum. Otherwise, a phrase such as nihil ad rem, roughly 'not to the point' should serve.


3

Your translation is correct and proper.


3

“The principle of explosion” is a modern metaphor. In the time when Latin had a significant population of native speakers, nobody would have used it. In any way you decide to express it in Latin, you have to force a new meaning on old words. You could play the game of trying to guess what an ancient Roman's choice of words would be if he were suddenly ...


2

Your translation is fine, but a Roman may have preferred to express the shared prepositional phrase only once, perhaps like this: Ex nihilo igitur fiunt et aliquid et nihil.


2

I think there is a simple explanation for these two meanings: noto, -are, the base word, means "to signify, indicate, denote." Denoto The prefix de- can mean many things, such as "down" or "ending." In this case, however, it simply strenghtens the idea, as noted in L&S II.2.c.: With reference to the terminus of the action; with reference to the ...


2

Apparātus is a very general-purpose word in Latin, but in classics and textual criticism, it refers to extra material that an editor has attached to a work; I'd translate it as "footnote". For example, an apparātus criticus explains how the primary sources differ for a given line. An apparātus fontium, then, is a "footnote of sources". In other words, an ...


1

It seems to me like you answer your own question. The word is quite precise and certainly not going to be found in classical dictionaries, but specialist dictionaries contain the word. The Thomas-Lexikon (unfortunately in German!) translates unibilitas as "Vereinbarkeit," which is roughly "compatibility." Such a translation illuminates the meaning but ...


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