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13 votes

Why the use of "eum" instead of "eius" in

Here's the context: Ancilla ānulum gemmātum in digitō dominae pōnit. In quō digitō? In digitō quārtō, nam ānulus ad eum digitum convenit. My translation: The servant girl places the jewelled ring ...
Cairnarvon's user avatar
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12 votes
Accepted

Why the use of "eum" instead of "eius" in

Both eum and eius would be grammatically correct, but they mean different things. Eum (from is, ea, id) when modifying a noun is a demonstrative pronoun. The ring fits that finger as opposed to a ...
Kingshorsey's user avatar
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11 votes

"Audi nos" translation problem

Nos can be either "we" or "us." The nominative and accusative for it are the same. It's not that different from the English "you", which can be the subject (vos auditis, &...
cmw's user avatar
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9 votes
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Use of the personal pronoun demonstratively

It would in fact be more accurate to say that is, ea, id is a demonstrative pronoun that is often used personally, rather than a personal pronoun that is used demonstratively. Lewis & Short refers ...
brianpck's user avatar
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8 votes
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Mors mea or mors meī?

Another use of the genitive that you've left out is subjective genitive, which is what this is. These are discussed in, e.g., Gildersleeve and Lodge, Latin grammar §363. Allen and Greenough, New Latin ...
cnread's user avatar
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7 votes

Why the use of "eum" instead of "eius" in

This is a difficult sentence to translate, and I think the key to translating it is realizing that is, ea, id — in addition to being a third-person pronoun (he, she, it) — can also be a determiner ...
ktm5124's user avatar
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6 votes

Is ipsum/ipsa/ipse a third person pronoun, or can it serve other functions?

As Joonas said, ipse is an intensifier, not a pronoun in and of itself. Caesar ipse hoc dixit. Caesar himself said this! The trick is, Latin leaves out pronouns all the time. So you'll sometimes ...
Draconis's user avatar
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6 votes
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Why is "mecum" backwards?

Postpositive cum is rather unique in Latin in this regard (but not for PIE - see below), although there are some other postpositive uses found in Latin; they are well-known, e.g. Leumann mentions quo-...
Alex B.'s user avatar
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6 votes

"Audi nos" translation problem

The key concept here is that of grammatical case. Latin has several cases, of which two are important here: the nominative and the accusative. Let me illustrate this through English. In the sentence &...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes

Why the use of "eum" instead of "eius" in

“…to that finger.” Not “to his/her finger”. It’s emphasizing a specific finger as opposed to emphasizing the person. The finger must have been referenced earlier in the text.
Stephen Darrenkamp's user avatar
5 votes

Why is "mecum" backwards?

This is a cross-linguistic phenomenon: pronouns, especially if they cliticise, can have a different syntax from the nouns they replace. For a very nearly parallel example, consider Germanic ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
4 votes

Is EUM the only possible translation for HIM as direct object?

Him (meaning 'this man,' 'that man.') hunc, illum, istum, (also (derogatory) ollum Cicero, but this usage decried by Quintilian) also ollus, a, um, old form for ille, q. v. Lewis and Short perseus ...
Hugh's user avatar
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4 votes
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Is EUM the only possible translation for HIM as direct object?

Your suggestion eum would indeed be the standard one. There are options, based on the fact that the English "he" does not correspond to a single Latin pronoun. Instead of is you could use ille and ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes

Is ipsum/ipsa/ipse a third person pronoun, or can it serve other functions?

The pronoun ipse is not a third person pronoun. It can be used with the first or second person just as well. The closest English word I can think of is "-self" from which one can form "myself", "...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes

Mors mea or mors meī?

An unlearned but hopefully useful answer. Searching a large corpus of texts gives: mors mea: 2,612 hits mors mei: 26 hits mors tua: 4,821 hits mors tui: 80 hits mors sua: 969 hits mors sui: 49 hits ...
luchonacho's user avatar
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3 votes

Why is "mecum" backwards?

In Orator Cicero writes: Quid, illud non olet unde sit, quod dicitur cum illis, cum autem nobis non dicitur, sed nobiscum? Quia si ita diceretur, obscaenius concurrerent litterae, ut etiam modo, ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
2 votes

What is the difference between is, ille, and hic when they mean "he"?

Pronoun differences. In my beginner-Latin courses, my instructors were fairly explicit with the differences; In classical Latin, hic was a pronoun that indicated closeness to a person either in ...
Nickimite's user avatar
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