New answers tagged

2

Your question gives me the impression that you might be confused about the following points: The perfect passive infinitive of "amo" is formed with the infinitive esse and a form of the perfect passive particicle amatus/amata/amatum. Any perfect passive participle inflects like an adjective of the first and second declension, with a masculine ...


2

I don't think it's 100% right to translate infinitives as participles, as you're doing. Esse is less "being" and more "to be," and the difference isn't trivial. Esse, for example, cannot be used attributively, whereas participles can. It's the difference between étant and être. For your specific questions, yes, in English the perfect ...


5

Both habuerō and lēgerō (not legerō, as there is no such form) are future perfect forms. A very literal translation of the end of the quote would be: Sī unquam habuerō codicēs saeculārēs, sī lēgerō, tē negāvī. If I will ever have had secular books and if I will have read them, I have denied you. That is, Jerome can only possess and read such books if he ...


Top 50 recent answers are included