New answers tagged

4

One way to speak generally, without naming a specific subject, is to use an impersonal verb like oportet: Oportet capitula perlegere si examen transibis. (Literally: It is proper/necessary to read the chapters thoroughly if you will pass the exam.) Another way is to use tu as the subject, as we often say "you" in English to denote anyone, not ...


2

I would say: "Bene capita inspectanda (sunt) ut succedere possit." Word-by-word this is: "[Well] [the chapters] [must be studied + (be.PRESENT)] [so that] [to succeed] [one is able]." When a word lacks a subject, it becomes passive. The form the passive takes depends on the tense and mood of the verb. Since you expressed a phrase ...


Top 50 recent answers are included