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I can't come up with an exact match now, but I think Ovid would be a good candidate to start looking for. He wrote a lot about love. He also wrote Tristia ("Sorrows"), which he write after going into exile, but after a brief search I didn't find something expression the "no regrets, look back happy" sentiment. Homer, Sappho and Catullus would be other ...


4

“noli … equi dentes inspicere donati” is cited as a “vulgare proverbium” by Jerome in the preface to his commentary on the (Pauline) Epistle to the Ephesians (not his translation of that epistle, as wrongly stated in the linked Wiktionary article). This takes it back to about 387, old enough to be (nearly) classical. It is quoted in context here: https://...


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The nearest thing, possibly, encompassing "mistrust" & "gifts" would be the well-known: "timeo Danaos et dona ferentes" = "I fear the Greeks, even when bearing gifts." (Virgil, "Aeneid" 2.49) Surprised that no-one offered this, at the time; unless, in some way, it's completely wrong? The Romans claimed to admire the Greeks; but, really, they despised ...


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