13

Here's Cicero, congratulating his friend Atticus on the birth of the latter's daughter (Ad Atticum 5.19): Filiolam tuam tibi iam Romae iucundam esse gaudeo, eamque quam numquam vidi tamen et amo et amabilem esse certo scio. Etiam atque etiam vale. I am glad that you now delight in your little daughter in Rome, and though I have never seen her, I still love ...


10

As is often the case with these quotes, it's actually a summary of a summary of Plato. We see an early version in Ernst Cassirer's 1944 essay An Essasy on Man: It is impossible—says Plato in the Republic—to implant truth in the soul of a man as it is to give the power of seeing to a man born blind...Here we have the new, indirect answer to the question &...


6

Lucretius wrote his famous De Rerum Natura to propagate the philosophical teachings of Epicurus in Latin. He makes a big deal of the distinction between the animus, which he identifies with mind (mens) and places in the chest (pectus), and the anima, which he calls a "vital heat and wind" (3.128: calor ac ventus vitalis) and sees as dispersed ...


5

Shelley P. Haley in Be Not Afraid of the Dark treats color in the boarder context of race. The author wisely notes that we cannot assume that the Romans attached any "value to skin-color differences" despite of those skin-color differences were clearly noticed by them. Though many times simply omitted (as the case of Dido in Aeneid), descriptions ...


4

I did a corpus search for those terms near each other. Cicero discusses something on this topic in the first book of Tusculanae Disputationes: sed alii in corde, alii in cerebro dixerunt animi esse sedem et locum; animum autem alii animam, ut fere nostri declarat nomen: nam et agere animam et efflare dicimus et animosos et bene animatos et ex animi ...


2

In Cicero's De Re Publica, Book I, there's a conversation between Scipio and Laelius which deals with this sort of conflict: S. Ergo non probares, si consilio pulso libidines, quae sunt innumerabiles, iracundiaeve tenerent omnia? (Scipio. Then you would not approve that the evil passions, which are innumerable, should expel conscience, and that lusts and ...


1

It has to be noted that Republic (Res publica / Public affair), and Democracy (Δημοκρατία, Δῆμος + Κράτος / People Power) are not the same thing. A republic can be an oligarchy (or anything else) and still cater for public affairs, but a democracy is a system that is controlled and exercised by the people themselves. In fact the ancient Greek word equivalent ...


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