24

It sounds like you're talking about this incident involving the Holy Roman Emperor Sigismund at the Council of Constance in 1414: …A similar anecdote is told of the German Emperor Sigismund. When presiding at the Council of Constance, he addressed the assembly in a Latin speech, exhorting them to eradicate the schism of the Hussites. 'Videte Patres,' he ...


18

The Greeks were keenly aware of dialectal differences, and long before the Romans came on the scene, the Greeks had already categorized their dialects into three or four common groups: Ionic (with Attic a sub-group), Doric, Aeolic, and Arcadian. A great, free introduction to this is Buck's Greek Dialects (or here; the third edition is still under copyright). ...


18

Titus Livius, an excellent scholar even by modern standards, was very conscious of the problem of source reliability. Consider the beginning of Liv. 26 49: tum obsides ciuitatium Hispaniae uocari iussit; quorum quantus numerus fuerit piget scribere, quippe ubi alibi trecentos ferme, alibi tria milia septingentos uiginti quattuor fuisse inueniam.—aeque et ...


13

The first example that comes to my mind is the beginning of the Second Catilinarian: Tandem aliquando, Quirites, L. Catilinam furentem audacia, scelus anhelantem, pestem patriae nefarie molientem, vobis atque huic urbi ferrum flammamque minitantem, ex urbe vel eiecimus, vel emisimus, vel ipsum egredientem verbis prosecuti sumus. Abiit, excessit, evasit, ...


11

The first thing to note when looking at passages and remarks by Romans about “punctuation” is that it is not always clear at first glance whether they are discussing elements of oral delivery or written marks in a text. “Punctuation” or pungere, after all, simply means to puncture or create a gap which can apply equally to oral or written discourse. There ...


10

The Egyptian god Harpocrates was typically depicted as a boy with his finger held to his lips. Example here. He makes a few appearances in classical literature, such as Ovid, Metamorphoses 9.692: inerant lunaria fronti cornua cum spicis nitido flaventibus auro et regale decus; cum qua latrator Anubis, sanctaque Bubastis, variusque coloribus Apis, ...


10

I don't know of a good way to distinguish patere from patēre in a corpus search, so I think you have three choices: Look through the results. Come up with another search that captures what you are looking for. Try to think of a contextual word that would remove (most) false positives. As it happens, all three methods worked for me! The second result in ...


9

The PHI Classical Latin Texts Database http://latin.packhum.org The Packard Humanities Institute provides free access to Latin Litterature texts from the beginning to ~200 AD. There are currently two functions for searching through the database. It can be involved by using some keywords : You can refine a search with logical operators. & and | or ...


9

I found a non-classical reference to this gesture in the Metamorphoses (or Golden Ass) of Apuleius (AD 124-170): At ille, digitum a pollice proximum ori suo admovens et in stuporem attonitus, ‘Tace, tace,’ inquit, et circumspiciens tutamenta sermonis, ‘Parce’ inquit, 'In feminam divinam, ne quam tibi lingua intemperante noxam contrahas.' (I.8)


9

Lucian of Samosata, a satirist writing in the second century CE, never had much regard for historians. His most famous work, the Alēthē Diēgēmata ("True Histories"), specifically mocks the sort of ridiculous stories that historians liked to recount as true. Here's how he puts it in the introduction: …τῶν ἱστορουμένων ἕκαστον οὐκ ἀκωμῳδήτως ᾔνικται πρός ...


8

Well, here's one example I found: nam contra Graeci adspirare ei solent, ut pro Fundanio Cicero testem qui primam eius litteram dicere non possit inridet. the Greeks on the other hand habitually aspirate this letter [f], so that Cicero, in his defence of Fundanius, mocked a witness who couldn't pronounce the first letter of that name. Quintilian, ...


8

The phrase is actually slightly different: ambulatoria enim est voluntas defuncti usque ad vitae supremum exitum. This means: For the will of a dead man is changeable until his final departure from life. This comes from the Digest (or Pandects): The Digest, also known as the Pandects (Latin: Digesta seu Pandectae, adapted from Ancient Greek ...


8

The Via dei Fori Imperiali was built at the initiative of Mussolini. At the time it caused some controversy about the care for archaeological and sacred Catholic sites, as well as the displacement of residents on "one of the most densely populated areas" of the Urbs. Among the ancient sites affected, there were the four fora that give the via its modern ...


8

Francis Bacon is referencing previous "remembrances" The beginning of the epilogue to The King's Two Bodies: A Study in Medieval Political Theology, by Ernst Kantorowicz, references this quotation from Bacon and includes an explanation of their probable sources: Bacon's first "remembrance" should not be mistaken for the famous Camaldolite motto Memento ...


7

The French catalog Arlima proposes a list of such works: http://www.arlima.net/uz/voyage.html Bernard le Sage, Itinerarium Burchardus de Monte Sion Giovanni de' Marignolli, Chronica Bohemorum Giovanni di Pian del Carpino, Historia Mongalorum ou Liber Tartarorum Guillaume de Rubrouck, Itinerarium ad partes orientales Iacopo da Verona, Liber ...


7

I know of two works that fall slightly outside the boundaries of your question but that I'll mention just in case they might be useful. The first is the Itinerarium Egeriæ, which was written, as far as I understand, near the end of the 4th century A.D.—so a little before your time period, but not too much so. The second is the Mirabilia descripta, or ...


7

Nostalgia is definitely a modern word. It was first coined by Johannes Hofer in 1688 in his Dissertatio Medica de Nostalgia. About devising the word, he wrote: (from Nostalgia: Origins and Ends of an Unenlightened Disease, by Helmut Illbruck, p. 5) However, the construction of desiderium + gen. of the object longed for + a verb that describes how the ...


7

Lewis and Short define “libertas” as (among other things) “Political freedom, liberty, or independence of a people not under monarchical rule, or not subject to another people (opp. servitus and dominatus)”. However, the only one of the passages cited which attests the sense of "political independence of one country from another" is the statement in Caesar ...


7

Juv. 3: raedarum transitus arto vicorum in flexu et stantis convicia mandrae eripient somnum Druso vitulisque marinis. "The continual traffic of carriages in the narrow twisting streets and the swearing of the drover when his herd has come to a halt would deprive a Drusus or the seals of sleep." (translated by S. Morton Braund) Sen. Clem. 1.6: ...


7

It seems that interbreeding between wolves and dogs was deemed possible in Roman culture at least at the time of Pliny the Elder (I cent. CE.) But so was the idea of interbreeding between dogs and tigers. I was curious and went to Pliny's Naturalis Historia. It happens to have separate chapters for wolves and dogs. The latter happens to mention wolves and.....


6

Hic enim dies vobis, patres conscripti, inluxit, haec potestas data est, ut, quantum virtutis, quantum constantiae, quantum gravitatis in huius ordinis consilio esset, populo Romano declarare possetis. — Cicero Phil. V, 2 init. Your question sent me straight to the Philippics. Brutus, after reading this, commenting in this letter to Cicero, thought it ...


6

I think you need a fairly direct reference to what happened a hundred years ago. What Finland actually achieved was, I think, the restoration of the freedom of self-government, which suggests some such phrase as Respublica restituta — or simply, even, Finnia restituta (but note that you shouldn't actually say liberatio with the genitive Finniae as such). ...


6

The best search terms I've found are trabs, -is and chasma, -atis. Literally meaning a wooden beam, trabs was applied by both Pliny and Seneca to something which might be the aurora (though L&S say it was probably a meteor). Pliny's Natural History II.26-7: Emicant et trabes simili modo, quas δοκους vocant [...] fit et caeli ipsius hiatus, quod ...


6

This is a meta-answer on How to find Latin corpora? Go to the Virtual Language Observatory (run by the European Union financed CLARIN project), search all resources and restrict the search to Latin Language and Resource type Corpus. On the day of writing this answer, this search yields 26 hits. The corpora are of very different nature and often contain ...


6

As for ancient sources, I looked in Van Heck's Breviarium urbis Romae antiquae, which gathers ancient references to ancient monuments, etc. Of the 3 primary references to Trajan's Column, one is the text of the inscription on the base; and one from Epit. de Caes. (which I'm not familiar with) and one from Eutropius basically just mention the column as being ...


6

Could it be Catullus 95? I quote the whole thing because it is a sustained attack on prolix poetry (unlike his own small, polished nuggets of verse) but it might be line 3 that you're thinking of. The text has gaps but most translators supply "year" after uno and assume quingenta lines. Zmyrna mei Cinnae, nonam post denique messem quam coeptast ...


6

Bōs, bovis, m/f This is the usual type of common-gender noun. In the feminine, it means "cow". Livy 1.7.6: Inde cum actae boves quaedam ad desiderium, ut fit, relictarum mugissent, reddita inclusarum ex spelunca boum vox Herculem convertit. (Heinemann trans) As the cattle were being driven off, some of them lowed, as usually happens, missing ...


6

You can find some at Attalus, along with a bunch from Roman Britain. The latter is region-specific, but breaks it all down for you. There isn't one way to do so, and there's no special language that can be applied to every curse, though certain themes and vocabulary are frequent and sometimes "magical" gibberish is used in incantations. Lead tablets are ...


6

A type of curse seems to have been the phrase "te perdant" after a deity. For example, "Iuppiter te perdat!" and "Iuppiter te dique perdant!", which seem to mean something like "That Jupiter destroys you!" (from here via google) More generally: (from here via google) Another form of curse seems to have been "i in malam crucem!" (or "abi in malam crucem!",...


6

One sometimes finds valere + infinitive used with the sense of 'to have the ability or power to' (OLD definition 6). I'm not sure it really has more gravity than posse; at any rate, I tend to think that the mere fact that it's being used instead of the more obvious posse makes it somewhat 'marked' in the sentence.


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