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25 votes
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Does "ad" have its origin in Hebrew/Semitic languages?

No, the similarity is almost certainly accidental. This kind of coincidental similarity is pretty common, especially in short words like ad. Latin ad "to, near, at" has cognates in several other ...
TKR's user avatar
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11 votes
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Parsing a present perfect participle

Lavatum here isn't a perfect passive participle, but a supine. When it's accusative (ends in -um) and is coupled with a verb of motion (here eunt, "they go"), it expresses purpose. Here's a ...
cmw's user avatar
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9 votes
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Where to put the enclitic -ne?

Your idea is correct. Lewis-Short is not terribly clear: added in a direct question, as an interrogation mark, to the first or principal word of the clause but, if you know German, Georges is ...
Dario's user avatar
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8 votes

Parsing a present perfect participle

In addition to cmw's answer, both of your interpretations are unworkable as the Latin text stands: Your first interpretation (“the washed Romans”) cannot be true because lavatum does not agree with ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
8 votes

How to say "as" emphatically?

I suggest that simple word order would also do the trick here: Marcus locutus est dux [or procurator or whatever].
cnread's user avatar
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7 votes
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Combining verbs with ecce or en

Both ecce and en can be used with verbs/whole clauses in addition to nouns, to draw attention to some fact rather than an object. So, both ecce [or en] leo edit and ecce [en] leo edens (or ecce [en] ...
cnread's user avatar
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7 votes
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How to say "as" emphatically?

Another option (in addition to the several excellent ones in answers so far) is to use (in) loco + gen., as in the phrase in loco parentis "as a parent, in the position of a parent". Lewis and Short (...
TKR's user avatar
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6 votes

How to say "as" emphatically?

I should like to extend @brianpck's answer by providing two further suggestions. 1. A neat way to express this is by using qua, as in these examples: — Ad hoc stipatum tribunal, atque etiam ex ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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6 votes

How to say "as" emphatically?

A common and classically attested way of saying "to perform the role of X" is munere X fungi, where "X" is an adjective or genitive noun. Here is an example: fungar enim iam ...
brianpck's user avatar
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6 votes
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How to swear by a god?

This answer only concerns Latin; I will leave Greek to others. Vocative is not the way to go here. It is used for addressing the god, not for such exclamations. (At least I have never seen it in such ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
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What is the relation and history of 'si' and 'sic'?

Here is de Vaan's entry for both forms: By this account (which I think is uncontroversial), both forms come from the locative singular of the demonstrative *so- "this", with an added ...
TKR's user avatar
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5 votes
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Ne ... quidem with preposition

Ne...quidem can most definitely surround nouns in cases other than nominative: Apuleius, Metamorphoses 9.27 (genitive): non sum barbarus nec agresti morum squalore praeditus nec ad exemplum ...
cnread's user avatar
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5 votes

Omission of a repeated verb in second part of a μέν ... δέ

A lot of grammars describe the characteristics of sentences involving the particles μέν and δέ. A good example of that is A Greek Grammar for Colleges by Herbert Weir Smyth. In spite of a detailed ...
Expedito Bipes's user avatar
3 votes

When does si mean "that"?

The easy part of your question is the part about Latin. “si” is simply a literal translation of εἰ. The difficult part is why the Greek original uses εἰ (“if”) when it clearly intends “that”. There ...
fdb's user avatar
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3 votes
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When does si mean "that"?

Although it could be read as whether, translations are almost1 consistent in translating these particular instances of si as that. There are a couple of meanings of si that are equivalent to quod (...
Rafael's user avatar
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2 votes

(Greek) what's a "γε causal"?

(This answer may not be satisfying, and I'm happy to have it supplanted in the future! But for now…) I've never heard of a "γε causal", nor have any of the classicists I've talked to. A Google ...
Draconis's user avatar
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2 votes

How can I intensify a phrase?

A common way to intensify a phrase in Latin is to place an intensifier on its verb. An intensifier is a prefix, often a preposition or some other adverb, placed on the verb which can intensify it. In ...
Figulus's user avatar
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2 votes

Omission of a repeated verb in second part of a μέν ... δέ

I came across this sentence in Plato (Symposium 206c): τίκτειν δὲ ἐν μὲν αἰσχρῷ οὐ δύναται, ἐν δὲ τῷ καλῷ. And it cannot beget on the ugly, but on the beautiful. This μέν...δέ sentence omits the ...
b a's user avatar
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