9 votes
Accepted

Meaning of a present participle in a verse of Vergil's Eclogue 8

It is a typical feature of Latin that participles are used instead of finite verbs, even where we would not expect that in our own languages, or it would sound stilted. This is frequently encountered ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
9 votes

Why sōns but absēns?

Ruppel 2013 seems to offer the kind of explanation that I was thinking of, that absens and praesens were simply adapted to make their endings fit better with the usual morphology of Latin third-...
Asteroides's user avatar
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7 votes
Accepted

LLPSI: Ch. 14, Ln. 38, "et oculōs aperiēns..."

Aperiēns is an active present participle, which is a verb form that can take a direct object. Aperiēns and oculōs go together, but not by means of aperiēns modifying the noun; the noun is the direct ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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7 votes

Is an infinitive as a noun neuter in gender?

It is best to distinguish between the 'true' infinitive (esse, vocare, vinci) and compound or periphrastic infinitives, which are really a construction of a participle plus the infinitive esse (...
Cerberus's user avatar
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6 votes

Are the present infinitive of the active periphrastic and the future active infinitive of the verb the same concept?

Basically, yes. But that terminology is highly confusing, in my opinion. In the terminology I'm used to, the periphrastic future goes like recturus sum, "I will rule". Its infinitival form ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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6 votes

What is the fourth principal part of an intransitive verb in this sentence?

As discussed in some previous questions on this site, the fourth principal part in -um is sometimes interpreted as a supine form, sometimes as a neuter passive participle: amatus or amatum - which ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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4 votes

Are the present infinitive of the active periphrastic and the future active infinitive of the verb the same concept?

The active (or first) periphrastic conjugation denotes a future or intended action. It competes with the normal future tense, which also denotes future actions, but generally does not have the ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Is this a perfect passive infinitive with "esse" omitted?

As you & Kingshorsey say, it is quite clear that in this example there are two perfect passive infinitives that are coordinated: missam (esse) and latam esse. Note that in this example it is not ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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3 votes

Meaning of a present participle in a verse of Vergil's Eclogue 8

The prefix prae- means things like "in front" and the hopefully familiar participle veniens is roughly "coming" so praeveniens is "coming in front" or "preceding&...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes

Comparison of participles

Pliny, writing of the pyramids of Gizeh in Naturalis Historia XXXVI: sed multo spectatior [comparative degree of positive spectatus, specto's perfect passive participle], "but much more splendid&...
Kevin McFoy Dunn's user avatar

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