12

Egressi Trojani is in the nominative because it's the subject of agerent. The structure of the sentence is a bit unusual, but it's clearer when you move the cum to its vanilla position before the egressi Trojani, since the whole thing is a subordinate cum causalis: Ibi, [cum egressi Trojani, quibus ab immenso prope errore nihil praeter arma et naves ...


9

In Martial 8,75 it says Hic mihi de multis unus, Lucane, videtur, Cui merito dici 'mortue Galle' potest. “Mortue Galle” was (or so commentators claim) a term from gladiatorial fights; the Murmillo in Gallic armour was customarily greeted so. I also found several examples for moriture on the Packhum website.


8

The ultimate answer to these sorts of things is always "convention." They do it because the what they worked with did it. Maybe some editor or another justified their particular adoption of it, but I'm sure that's a rarity. However, in this case, the answer is actually "you just haven't seen them yet." There are dictionaries which use the ...


8

No, an active participle can't be translated with a passive meaning. (The opposite, a passive participle translated with an active meaning, is possible, but only if the verb is deponent.) So only your first translation is possible. Assuming this isn't just an error on your instructor's part, presumably some object is meant to be implied, e.g. "the poet ...


8

Omnis secreti is genitive with capax, which means 'most capable of holding' (OLD definition 2). Although capax is generally used in this sense to describe objects, it's being used to describe a person here. I would translate, as you did, 'most capable of keeping any secret.' I suppose you could supply a form of the esse, but quamquam is not uncommonly used ...


8

In A Grammar of the Latin Language, Karl Gottlob Zumpt says, But by the combination of the participle future active with the tenses of esse a really new conjugation is formed denoting an intention to do something. This intention may arise either from the person's own will , or from outward circumstances, so that, e. g., scripturus sum may either mean “I ...


7

I doubt this is the only possible solution (it may not even be the best), but I think it works reasonably well for your two examples. The passive of videre can be paired with the future active participle to indicate the outcome that's anticipated (even if only by the speaker). This construction is amply attested, being found in Cicero, Livy, Seneca, Tacitus, ...


7

As Allen & Greenough (§499) points out, one nuance that this participle can express is 'likelihood or 'certaintly.' Sometimes, this certainty is so strong, that it even seems to approach inevitability or 'destiny.' One example that comes immediately to mind is letter 6.16.2 of Pliny, the first of two letters to Tacitus about the eruption of Vesuvius: ...


7

It's long. The two consonants after the vowel mean that poetic meter can't tell us anything about the vowel length. However, ē and ĕ had different descendants in Romance: ē became Proto-Romance e, while ĕ became Proto-Romance ɛ. In stressed syllables, Spanish generally shows e for Romance e, but ie for Romance ɛ: miedo < mĕtum "fear", but deber &...


7

Every Latin verb has three stems: the present stem, the perfect stem and the supine stem. The dictionary is tasked with telling you, for every verb, what the three stems are. Therefore it gives you (usually in abbreviated form) the first person singular indicative active of the present and perfect tense and the first supine (a.k.a. the -um supine). The third ...


5

As far as I'm aware, it tends to be a difference between the UK and the US. In the UK, the fourth principal part (-um) is the supine; in the US (-us) it's the masc. nom. PPP.


5

Sure! Try to do this kind of search: https://latin.packhum.org/search?q=iture


5

Hidden quantity in long syllables The convention adopted by Lewis and Short seems to be not to indicate a vowel quantity if the syllable is long anyway. For example, they write făcĭo , fēci, factum, without indicating whether it is făctum or fāctum. In fact, what they indicate with a macron might well be the length of the whole syllable, not just the vowel,...


4

The very opening line of Horace's Odes goes: Maecenas atavis edite regibus… You Maecenas, who descend from ancestors that were kings… The vocative of the participle editus plays a prominent role. There is a question on who these atavi were if you want to dig deeper.


4

I think that the four examples from Ovid given by blagae are not quite relevant to the question raised by the OP: all of them can be argued to show a clearly adjectival behavior and are not infrequent at all in Classical Latin. It is not correct to say, as blagae does, that these examples "occur sporadically". One can apply the typical tests to ...


2

The only example of impersonal passive in L&S's entry of cado comes from Late Latin: Augustinus (De dono perseverantiae), which is beyond the scope of PHI. Finem autem dico, quo vita ista finitur, in qua tantummodo periculum est ne cadatur (Aug. Don. Persev. 1,1). The fact that you didn't find any example of impersonal passive caditur in PHI is ...


1

The periphrastic future tenses are often used to convey the subject’s intention at the time of the auxiliary verb. venturus sum = I intend to come venturus eram = I was intending to come But you are right in that is can also be used as equivalent to simple future.


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