17

I think it is the Christ monogram ΧΡ, followed by the genetive ending -i. Those are not the Latin letters X and P, but rather the Greek letters Chi and Rho, which are the first letters in the word ΧΡΙΣΤΟΣ (Christos). This is one of the oldest and most famous Christograms, but usually the letters are on top of each other. In this case they appear to have ...


15

The word is reservaculum, "something used to keep things in", from reservo "keep (back)". I believe this word is used to describe the pouch of marsupials in similar texts from that period. Praesumably, this was before the word marsupial was invented, which is derived from Latin marsupium, "pouch". Incidentally, you have uon where it should be non. A plain ...


15

This comes from the Book of Hours, and is the first part of the prayers at terce. Latin: Ad tertiam Deus in adiutorium meum intende. Domine ad adiuvandum me festina. Gloria P[atri, et Filio: et Spiritui sancto.] Sicut erat [in principio, et nunc, et semper: et in saecula saeculorum, Amen. Alleluia.] Hymnus: Memento salutis auctor. ...


13

The text says: Trinum deum et unum pronis men- tibus adoremus virginique matri gratulantibus animis iugiter iubilemus. Venite exultemus domino iubilemus de- o salutari nostro praeoccupemus faciem e- ius in confessione et in psalmis iubilemus ei. Quoniam deus magnus dominus et rex magnus super omnes deos quoniam I failed to find this ...


12

Lines 4 and following are Psalm 94. As to lines 1–3, I believe what we have is an example of an antiphon, where a bit of chant that is extraneous to a psalm precedes, follows, and sometimes (I believe) is also repeated between the verses of that psalm. Specifically, this should be an example of an invitatory, since it uses Psalm 94. The details from the ...


8

I can answer the second part, at least. That's a tilde ĩ, not a macron ī, and it's one of the most common scribal abbreviations, representing a following N or M. So anĩal, tẽpore, oblatũ = animal, tempore, oblatum. This is where the modern tilde used in Spanish and Portuguese comes from: Latin annum > anno > Spanish año "year". It originated as a small "N" ...


8

The heraldry makes play on ACRE (plough and barley brew) and HACKER (with the bladed instrument above the plough and the halberd). Such visual puns are called Canting Heraldry as the Heraldry Society explains. (Thanks! to TRiG) The latinised name below the heraldry simply reads Marci Ackerman (?Ackermani) : 1561 "Of Mark Ackerman : 1561" The words are ...


7

This is Greek lettering for a Latin Genitive: christi. There are three letters xpi, 'chi, rho, iota (or 'i');' and a siglum (^)showing abbreviation. The last letter of the ablative famula has tangled with the lower stroke of the 'chi.'


7

The UK National Archive runs a two part course which gives immediate feedback and quickly introduces .1. dating of mss .2. different styles of writing (book script, private notes, .3. post classical grammar .4. some abbreviations. You'll whizz through that. For simply the Abbreviations also known as Sigla For manuscripts earlier than 850, including a ...


6

This is undoubtedly from a book of prayers, possibly from a form of Breviary. The first half reads: (ad tertiam)Deus in adiutorium meum intendeDomine ad adiuvandum me festinaGloria p.sicut erat The Gloria Patri is a very common prayer, so only the first words of each sentence are written. The full prayer is: Gloria Patri et Filio et Spiritui ...


6

Here is my transcription. I've edited a couple of words. The semicolon / z-like mark can be used for et/ed as well, as here. Abbreviations in square brackets. 1) Alcuinis . Quattuor modis op[er]atur deus. 2) Primo in u[er]bo .ii. in mat[er]ia informi .Un[de]. qui viv[it] in e- 3) ternum creavit om[n]ia simul .tercio. p[er] op[er]a .vi. dier[um] va- ...


5

There is one book that you would find more useful than any other, and that is a Latin Bible. The internet provides access to Manuscripts from the British Library, and the Beinecke (Yale), and the Parker Library (Cambridge) and several others. So, visit the British library, and tell them you want to read St Cuthbert's copy of St John, Add MS 89000 in half ...


4

It says Vn~, so vn with a general mark of abbreviation. This mark normally stands for -de if it is written above an -n at the end of a word (provided that -de fits), so it must be unde here, "whence". I've found an 18th-century print edition of the Sententiae of Petrus Lombardus that has a similar use of unde with partly the same text, and ...


3

It's sed. Search for sed here. Other books I've seen say the same thing (such as this PDF).


3

In addition to the above answers, the following may provide some further background to your text. Following the trail to Trinity College, Dublin, I found the text online. The caption reads (in part): "This manuscript was created for the Order of the Most Holy Saviour, also known as the Bridgettines, a monastic order of Augustinian nuns." It dates from the ...


3

Thanks for your interesting question. I think the key is the sequence ..ptonesh.. which suggests Northamptonshire to me. et Joh.is Norgate de Naptoneshir If that doesn't seem likely, Du CANGE, Charles du Fresne, 1610-1806 Glossarium mediae et infimae latinitatis (in 10 vols) is on line through ARCHIVE. I checked vol six p.247 for occupations ...


2

Have you seen this book? FWIW Scully, Terence. 1997. The vivendier: a critical edition with English translation. Totnes, Devon, England: Prospect Books.


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